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Monophysitism
(448 words)

[German version]

Monophysitism, a term known since the 7th cent. AD, refers to the doctrine that Christ, after the union of the divine and human, has a single nature (μόνος/mónos, single; φύσις/phýsis, nature). In a narrower sense, monophysites are opponents (who may be of a variety of theological and organisational backgrounds) of the doctrine of the two natures of Christ as stated by the Council of Calchedon (AD 451). Contrary to the definition of the Council (one person or hypostasis in two natures), they upheld the formula of Cyrillus [2] of Alexandria of ‘one incarnated nature of…

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Rist, Josef (Würzburg), “Monophysitism”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, Antiquity volumes edited by: Hubert Cancik and , Helmuth Schneider, English Edition by: Christine F. Salazar, Classical Tradition volumes edited by: Manfred Landfester, English Edition by: Francis G. Gentry. Consulted online on 04 December 2021 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e809120>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004122598, 20110510



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