Brill’s New Pauly

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Palladion, Palladium
(616 words)

[German version]

(Παλλάδιον/Palládion, Latin Palladium). A statue that guaranteed the protection of a city [1]. The most famous one is the Palladion of Troy, which already in Antiquity had been connected etymologically to Pallas [3] (Apollod. 3,12,3) and was claimed to have fallen from the sky (Pherecydes FGrH 3 F 179; Dion. Hal. Ant. 2,66,5; Ov. Fast. 6,421f.) and to have been brought by Dardanus [1] to Troy as Athena's gift (Dion. Hal. Ant. 1,68f.) or as a gift from Zeus (Iliupersis PEG I fr. 1). It was in the shape of a statuette of a standing and armed Athena…

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Prescendi, Francesca (Geneva), “Palladion, Palladium”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, Antiquity volumes edited by: Hubert Cancik and , Helmuth Schneider, English Edition by: Christine F. Salazar, Classical Tradition volumes edited by: Manfred Landfester, English Edition by: Francis G. Gentry. Consulted online on 25 November 2020 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e904560>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004122598, 20110510



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