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Perdix
(132 words)

[German version]

(Πέρδιξ/Pérdix , also called Talus or Calus), great-grandson of Erechtheus, nephew of  Daedalus [1], whose skill he surpassed - he is considered the inventor of, among other things, the saw and the compass (Ov. Met. 8,246ff.; Hyg. Fab. 39; Verg. G. 1,143) - and who therefore threw him to his death from the Acropolis  (Soph. fr. 323 TrGF; Hyg. Hab. 39). In Ov. Met. 8,251-253 P. is rescued by Athena, who turns him into a partridge (perdix), which watches the burial of Daedalus's son Icarus [1], who also fell to his death, maliciously applauding with its wings (ibid. 236ff.). Ac…

Cite this page
Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg), “Perdix”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, Antiquity volumes edited by: Hubert Cancik and , Helmuth Schneider, English Edition by: Christine F. Salazar, Classical Tradition volumes edited by: Manfred Landfester, English Edition by: Francis G. Gentry. Consulted online on 30 March 2020 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e913360>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004122598, 20110510



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