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Physiognomy
(678 words)

[German version]

(φυσιογνωμονία/physiognōmonía, Lat. physiognomia). Within ancient psychology, physiognomy represented a set of techniques, assessing a person's personality and character through the observation of physical characteristics and behaviour (Ps.-Aristot. Physiognom. 6-7).

Extant sources: the treatise Physiognōmoniká, attributed to Aristotle [6], but probably originating from the Peripatos and the 3rd cent. BC; based on this, Polemon's [6] treatise, written between AD 133 and 136, of which a fragment and an Arabic translation together with an adaptation by Ad…

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Touwaide, Alain (Madrid), “Physiognomy”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, Antiquity volumes edited by: Hubert Cancik and , Helmuth Schneider, English Edition by: Christine F. Salazar, Classical Tradition volumes edited by: Manfred Landfester, English Edition by: Francis G. Gentry. Consulted online on 11 December 2019 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e924910>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004122598, 20110510



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