Brill’s New Pauly

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Prison sentence
(108 words)

[German version]

Neither Greek nor Roman law is familiar with prison sentences as punitive detention in the modern sense (otherwise [1]). As a rule, until the trial the accused remains free (in Rome a kind of pre-trial confinement is permissible for political crimes), a convicted criminal only stays in prison until the execution of the sentence. Also, private detention of a debtor for a creditor, precisely regulated in Rome from the time of the Law of the Twelve Tables onwards, is not to punish but rather to force payment.

Addictus; Carcer; Desmoterion

Bibliography

1 …

Cite this page
Eder, Walter (Berlin), “Prison sentence”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, Antiquity volumes edited by: Hubert Cancik and , Helmuth Schneider, English Edition by: Christine F. Salazar, Classical Tradition volumes edited by: Manfred Landfester, English Edition by: Francis G. Gentry. Consulted online on 05 December 2019 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e420370>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004122598, 20110510



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