Suffect consul
(321 words)

[German version]

Roman magistrates (Magistratus) were, on principle, elected for one year only. When, however, a magistrate resigned or died during his term of office, a successor had to be appointed for the rest of that year. This successor was called suffectus (from sufficere, 'to grow again'). While by-elections were rare during the Republic, it became normal during the period of the Triumvirate (43-30 BC) and then from 5 BC, to appoint more than two consuls per year from the outset who were to hold office in succession and in pairs. At first, there were usually only two suffecti per year…

Cite this page
Eck, Werner (Cologne), “Suffect consul”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, Antiquity volumes edited by: Hubert Cancik and , Helmuth Schneider, English Edition by: Christine F. Salazar, Classical Tradition volumes edited by: Manfred Landfester, English Edition by: Francis G. Gentry. Consulted online on 21 October 2018 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e1125250>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004122598, 20110510



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