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Swaddling Clothes
(139 words)

[German version]

(σπάργανον/spárganon; Latin incunabula). SC in their modern form were not known in Antiquity; instead, a baby would be wrapped entirely - apart from the head - with narrow strips of wool. Wrapping was supposed to ensure the striaght growth of the body and the limbs (Sen. Ben. 6,24,1,  cf. Plin. HN 7,3). In Thessaly only the lower half of the body was wrapped, in Sparta SC were dispensed with entirely (Plut. Lycurgus 16,3). Depictions of babies survive from the Bronze Age onwards (e.g. [1. 104 f., cat. no. 14]), usually lying in a cradle; there are also some of naked bab…

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Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg), “Swaddling Clothes”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, Antiquity volumes edited by: Hubert Cancik and , Helmuth Schneider, English Edition by: Christine F. Salazar, Classical Tradition volumes edited by: Manfred Landfester, English Edition by: Francis G. Gentry. Consulted online on 25 July 2021 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e12211170>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004122598, 20110510



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