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Swimming
(387 words)

[German version]

(Egyptian nbj; Greek κολυμβᾶν/kolymbân; Latin natare). Swimming was a basic cultural skill as early as in ancient Egypt ([1]; likewise later in Greece, Pl. Leg. 689d; in Rome, Suet. Aug. 64,3: Augustus teaches his grandsons to swim) and was part of the education syllabus of high-ranking people, even of the king's children (biography of nomarch Cheti, end of 3rd millennium BC [2. document 3]). There are also sufficient sources for the Ancient Near East to assume that swimming was known [3]. In both the Ancient Near East and in Egypt, it occurs in myth in the form of diving: Gil…

Cite this page
Decker, Wolfgang (Cologne), “Swimming”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, Antiquity volumes edited by: Hubert Cancik and , Helmuth Schneider, English Edition by: Christine F. Salazar, Classical Tradition volumes edited by: Manfred Landfester, English Edition by: Francis G. Gentry. Consulted online on 27 February 2021 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e1105590>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004122598, 20110510



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