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Synkrisis
(311 words)

[German version]

(σύγκρισις/sýnkrisis; Latin comparatio). In ancient literature, synkrisis refers to the comparative juxtaposition of people and things. Through its agonal element, it is related to the genre of debate, both in prose and verse [9]. From the time of Homerus [1], comparisons were used to highlight a person or thing, from which synkrisis developed as a weighted ordering of similarities and differences in all literary genres. In rhetorical theory [6. 330-332, 336-339], the aim of synkrisis included praise (αὔξησις/aúxēsis, Aristot.  Rh. 1368a 19-29; Encomium) and …

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Gärtner, Hans Armin (Heidelberg), “Synkrisis”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, Antiquity volumes edited by: Hubert Cancik and , Helmuth Schneider, English Edition by: Christine F. Salazar, Classical Tradition volumes edited by: Manfred Landfester, English Edition by: Francis G. Gentry. Consulted online on 08 August 2020 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e1127330>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004122598, 20110510



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