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Uterus
(339 words)

[German version]

The two Greek terms μήτρα/mḗtra and ὑστέρα/hystéra are both of disputed etymology (Soran. Gynaecia 1,6) and are often used in the plural (the belief in its many chambers derives from animal anatomy). Hippocratic authors ( Corpus Hippocraticum ) shared the idea of the uterus as a jar moving up and down a tube in the body ( Vulva ) and closing in on itself during pregnancy. They were of the view that the uterus can, like a living creature, be attracted or repelled by pleasant or unpleasant smells, and that it held no fixed position inside the body (cf. Woman II. F.; Gynaecology B.)…

Cite this page
Nutton, Vivian (London), “Uterus”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, Antiquity volumes edited by: Hubert Cancik and , Helmuth Schneider, English Edition by: Christine F. Salazar, Classical Tradition volumes edited by: Manfred Landfester, English Edition by: Francis G. Gentry. Consulted online on 05 December 2020 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e1226450>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004122598, 20110510



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