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Wet-nurses
(438 words)

[German version]

While women in archaic Greece usually nursed their own children, the use of wet-nurses became more common in the classical period. The τιθήνη/tithḗnē or τίτθη/títh ē (the nanny who did not nurse was referred to as τροφός/trophós) was usually a slave (such as GVI 1729), although some free-born or freed women in Athens provided this service as well, usually ξέναι/xénai. In the visual arts, wet-nurses played a primarily attributive role up into the 4th cent., but later one can observe an increased interest in them - that is, in their function, less as persons.

In Rome, wet-nu…

Cite this page
Wiesehöfer, Josef (Kiel), “Wet-nurses”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, Antiquity volumes edited by: Hubert Cancik and , Helmuth Schneider, English Edition by: Christine F. Salazar, Classical Tradition volumes edited by: Manfred Landfester, English Edition by: Francis G. Gentry. Consulted online on 28 October 2020 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e118000>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004122598, 20110510



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