Encyclopaedia of Islam, First Edition (1913-1936)

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K̲h̲urramīya
(918 words)

, a sect whose name is derived by Samʿānī from the Persian word k̲h̲urram “agreeable”, on the ground that they regarded everything that was agreeable as lawful; but it is more likely to be derived from Ḵh̲urram, a district of Ardabīl, where the sect may have arisen. According to Masʿūdī, Murūd̲j̲, vi. 186, they came into prominence after the execution of Abū Muslim of Ḵh̲orāsān in 136 a. h., but while some of them denied that he was dead and foretold his return “to spread justice in the world”, others maintained the Imamate of his daughter Fāṭima, whence they got the names Muslimīya and Fāṭimīya. …

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Margoliouth, D. S., “K̲h̲urramīya”, in: Encyclopaedia of Islam, First Edition (1913-1936), Edited by M. Th. Houtsma, T.W. Arnold, R. Basset, R. Hartmann. Consulted online on 26 May 2020 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/2214-871X_ei1_SIM_4188>
First published online: 2012
First print edition: ISBN: 9789004082656, 1913-1936



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