Encyclopaedia of Islam, Second Edition

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Hindū-S̲h̲āhīs
(318 words)

, a native dynasty of northern India who were the first great opponents of G̲h̲aznawid and Islamic expansion into the Pand̲j̲āb. Bīrūnī in his Taḥḳīḳ mā li ’l-Hind describes them as originally Turks from Tibet who ruled in the Kābul river valley; it is possible that these “Turks” were Hinduized epigoni of the Kushans and Kidarites pushed eastwards by the Hephthalites [see hayāṭila ]. During the 4th/10th century these first Hindū-S̲h̲āhīs were replaced by a Brāhmanic line. In the time of the first G̲h̲aznawids Sebüktigīn and Maḥmūd [qq.v.], the Hindū-S̲h̲āhīs constituted a powerful…

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Bosworth, C.E., “Hindū-S̲h̲āhīs”, in: Encyclopaedia of Islam, Second Edition, Edited by: P. Bearman, Th. Bianquis, C.E. Bosworth, E. van Donzel, W.P. Heinrichs. Consulted online on 20 November 2019 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1573-3912_islam_SIM_2886>
First published online: 2012
First print edition: ISBN: 9789004161214, 1960-2007



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