Ḥud̲j̲d̲j̲a
(1,908 words)

(a.), pl. ḥud̲j̲ad̲j̲ , both proof and the presentation of proof. The term is Ḳurʾānic, and is applied to any argument—one that attempts to prove what is false (“worthless argument”), as well as one that attempts to prove what is true (“decisive argument”). Men should have no ) ḥud̲j̲d̲j̲a against God (IV, 165); if they argue ( yuḥad̲j̲d̲j̲ūna ) against Him, this argument is worthless in His eyes (XLII, 16; cf. XLV, 25). It is to God that “The decisive argument” belongs (VI, 149), and it was God who gave Abraham the (decisive) argument against his people (VI, 83). In the sense of “proof”, ḥud̲j̲d̲…

Cite this page
Gardet, L and Hodgson, M.G.S., “Ḥud̲j̲d̲j̲a”, in: Encyclopaedia of Islam, Second Edition, Edited by: P. Bearman, Th. Bianquis, C.E. Bosworth, E. van Donzel, W.P. Heinrichs. Consulted online on 10 December 2018 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1573-3912_islam_COM_0297>
First published online: 2012
First print edition: ISBN: 9789004161214, 1960-2007



▲   Back to top   ▲