Muʾāk̲h̲āt
(419 words)

(a.) “brothering”, is a practice found in the early days of Islam by which two men became “brothers”.

The best-known example is the “brothering” by Muḥammad of Emigrants from Mecca with Muslims from Medina. This may have happened soon after he reached Medina, but is placed by Ibn Isḥāḳ just before the battle of Badr, accompanied by a list of thirteen such pairs (Ibn His̲h̲ām, 344-6). It is clear, however, from Ibn Ḥabīb ( Muḥabbar , 70 f.) that there had previously been some “brothering” at Mecca, and he gives a list of nine pairs. This is confirmed partly by Ibn Isḥā…

Cite this page
Watt, W. Montgomery, “Muʾāk̲h̲āt”, in: Encyclopaedia of Islam, Second Edition, Edited by: P. Bearman, Th. Bianquis, C.E. Bosworth, E. van Donzel, W.P. Heinrichs. Consulted online on 24 February 2019 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1573-3912_islam_SIM_5267>
First published online: 2012
First print edition: ISBN: 9789004161214, 1960-2007



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