Encyclopaedia of Islam, Second Edition

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S̲h̲ahrangīz
(2,834 words)

(p.) or S̲h̲ahrās̲h̲ūb (“upsetting the town”), a genre of short love poems on young craftsmen, often related to the bazaars of specific towns.

1. In Persian

In Persian literature, the genre is usually referred to under the latter name. E.J.W. Gibb’s contention that the genre was invented by the Turkish poet Mesīḥī [q.v.] of Edirne (HOP, ii, 232), was challenged already by E.G. Browne who, pointing to Persian specimens mentioned by the Ṣafawid anthologist Sām Mīrzā [q.v.], concluded that “though they were probably written later than Masíḥí’s Turkish S̲h̲ahr-angíz on Adrianople, ther…

Cite this page
Bruijn, J.T.P. de, Halman, Talat Sait and Rahman, Munibur, “S̲h̲ahrangīz”, in: Encyclopaedia of Islam, Second Edition, Edited by: P. Bearman, Th. Bianquis, C.E. Bosworth, E. van Donzel, W.P. Heinrichs. Consulted online on 18 May 2021 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1573-3912_islam_COM_1026>
First published online: 2012
First print edition: ISBN: 9789004161214, 1960-2007



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