Encyclopaedia of Islam, Second Edition

Get access
Search Results: | 3 of 1,363 |

Sīmd̲j̲ūrids
(183 words)

, a line of Turkish commanders and governors, originally of slave origin, for the Sāmānids in 4th/10th-century K̲h̲urāsān.

The founder, Abū ʿImrān Sīmd̲j̲ūr, was the amīr Ismāʿīl b. Aḥmad’s [q.v.] ceremonial ink-stand bearer ( dawātī ). He became Sāmānid governor of Sīstān [q.v.] in 300-1/913-14 when the local dynasty of the Ṣaffārids [q.v.] were temporarily driven out. Thereafter, the family was prominent as governors of K̲h̲urāsān for the amīrs , involved in warfare with the Sāmānids’ rivals in northern Persia such as the Būyids, and they acquired a territoria…

Cite this page
Bosworth, C.E., “Sīmd̲j̲ūrids”, in: Encyclopaedia of Islam, Second Edition, Edited by: P. Bearman, Th. Bianquis, C.E. Bosworth, E. van Donzel, W.P. Heinrichs. Consulted online on 14 October 2019 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1573-3912_islam_SIM_7035>
First published online: 2012
First print edition: ISBN: 9789004161214, 1960-2007



▲   Back to top   ▲