Encyclopaedia of Islam, Second Edition

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ʿUbayd-I Zākānī
(909 words)

, or Niẓām al-Dīn ʿUbayd Allāh al-Zākānī, Persian poet of the Mongol period who became especially famous for his satires and parodies. He was born into a family of scholars and state officials descending from Arabs of the Banū Ḵh̲afād̲j̲a [q.v.] settled in the area of Ḳazwīn since early Islamic times. In 730/1329-30 the historian Ḥamd Allāh Mustawfī described him as a talented poet and a writer of learned treatises. A collection of Arabic sayings by prophets and wise men, entitled Nawādir al-amt̲h̲āl , belongs to this early period. When later in the same decade the central go…

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Bruijn, J.T.P. De, “ʿUbayd-I Zākānī”, in: Encyclopaedia of Islam, Second Edition, Edited by: P. Bearman, Th. Bianquis, C.E. Bosworth, E. van Donzel, W.P. Heinrichs. Consulted online on 29 May 2020 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1573-3912_islam_SIM_7670>
First published online: 2012
First print edition: ISBN: 9789004161214, 1960-2007



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