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Golden Age
(437 words)

In his epic poem Works and Days (lines 109–201), the Greek poet Hesiod (fl. ca. 800 b.c.) tells the story of a golden age in which humans lived like gods with no cares, illnesses, or wickedness. This period was followed by successive declines into the silver age and then the bronze. A heroic age arrested the decline but was followed finally by the iron age, which was full of plague and evil.

To the ancient idea of an ideal primitive age there correspond the myths in different cultures concerning an ideal place, paradise (an Iranian word), a garden (Eden, see Gen. 2:4–3:24), the mountain of Go…

Cite this page
Ritschl, Dietrich, “Golden Age”, in: Encyclopedia of Christianity Online. Consulted online on 25 May 2019 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/2211-2685_eco_G169>
First published online: 2011
First print edition: ISBN: 9789004169678, 20080512



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