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Hammurabi, Code of
(311 words)

The Code of Hammurabi is one of the oldest and best-known cuneiform law codes in Akkadian. It appears on a stele over 2 m. (6 ft.) high (now in the Louvre; there are many copies). It was promulgated by Hammurabi, king of the first dynasty of Babylon (1792–1750 b.c.), in an attempt at legal reform. In 282 casuistically formulated legal rulings, selected cases from various branches of law (trial, property, family, and inheritance) are dealt with, along with judgments concerning bodily injuries, various occupations, the hiring of cattle and servants, and the holding of slaves.

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Spieckermann, Hermann, “Hammurabi, Code of”, in: Encyclopedia of Christianity Online. Consulted online on 01 June 2020 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/2211-2685_eco_H17>
First published online: 2011
First print edition: ISBN: 9789004169678, 20080512



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