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Transcendentals
(349 words)

Deriving from Lat. transcendens (stepping over), the word “transcendentals” was used by the Scholastics (Scholasticism) for that which is far above ordinary categories. In reality, we find transcendentals in both Plato (427–347 b.c.; Platonism) and Aristotle (384–322 b.c.; Aristotelianism) as initial forms of being. We can define what is, in terms of its goodness, truth, or unity. Special features of transcendentals are that they lie beyond the ability of categories to predicate and that they are also mutually convertible: ens et unum, verum, bonum, pulchrum convertuntur (being …

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Hofmeister, Heimo, “Transcendentals”, in: Encyclopedia of Christianity Online. Consulted online on 24 November 2020 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/2211-2685_eco_T.75>
First published online: 2011
First print edition: ISBN: 9789004169678, 20080512



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