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Concentus
(128 words)

[German Version]

(Lat.: “a singing together; concord, agreement”) was an equivalent term in classical Roman usage to the Greek loan words symphonía and harmonía, meaning sounding together, or being in (musical) agreement. In the 16th century the term acquired a technical meaning at least in the treatise Musice active micrologus by Andreas Ornithoparcus (Leipzig 1517). In this treatise concentus refers to chants with a pronounced melodic content, for example hymns, sequences, antiphons, responsories, introits, tropes etc. Ornithoparcus contrasts these chants with simpl…

Cite this page
Flynn, William, “Concentus”, in: Religion Past and Present. Consulted online on 19 May 2022 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1877-5888_rpp_SIM_03185>
First published online: 2011
First print edition: ISBN: 9789004146662, 2006-2013



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