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Cynics,
(326 words)

[German Version]

a Greek philosophical school, believed to have been founded by a student of Socrates named Antisthenes (c. 455–360 bce), but whose truest representative was Diogenes of Sinope (died c. 320 bce). The name derives from Gk kýon, “dog,” an association explained by a comment of Philodem (after 110–40/35 bce) to the effect that the Cynics wanted to imitate a dog's way of life (Stoicorum Index Herculanensis, ed. D. Comparetti, 1875, 339, 8), by which they meant living without shame or following human conventions. The Cynics trivialized the strained re…

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Figal, Günter, “Cynics,”, in: Religion Past and Present. Consulted online on 22 October 2019 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1877-5888_rpp_SIM_12525>
First published online: 2011
First print edition: ISBN: 9789004146662, 2006-2013



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