Religion Past and Present

Get access

Discourse
(156 words)

[German Version]

is derived from Lat. discursus, “running to and fro,” and came to be used as a philosophical term in English and French (and thence also in German, as Diskurs), while “discursive” has been commonly employed as an antonym of “intuitive” since I. Kant. The English “discourse” and the French discours denote a linguistic unit that spans several sentences; it may be a speech, a narrative, a treatise, or a line of argumentation. In analytical philosophy, the “universe of discourse” denotes the sum of objects that can be quantified in …

Cite this page
Figal, Günter, “Discourse”, in: Religion Past and Present. Consulted online on 10 May 2021 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1877-5888_rpp_SIM_03751>
First published online: 2011
First print edition: ISBN: 9789004146662, 2006-2013



▲   Back to top   ▲