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Spontaneity
(225 words)

[German Version]

from Neo-Latin spontaneitas, based on Latin spons, “incentive, will,” the ablative of which (sponte), means “of one’s own accord,” self-motivated. A movement is spontaneous if it is not caused by something inherent in the person who moves or in someone or something else. In this sense, Aristotle already distinguished between motion that arises “from itself ” (ἀπὸ ταυτομάτου/apó tautomátou, Metaph. VII 7, 1032a 13) and motion caused by nature or art (τέχνη/téchnē). The notion first became prominent, however, in modern philosophy under the category of…

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Figal, Günter, “Spontaneity”, in: Religion Past and Present. Consulted online on 22 October 2019 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1877-5888_rpp_SIM_025688>
First published online: 2011
First print edition: ISBN: 9789004146662, 2006-2013



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