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Novensides, Di.

(487 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt)
[English version] Eine Gruppe von Gottheiten, deren Verehrung sich inschr. in Marruvium (Vetter Nr. 225 = [1. 43-47 Nr. 36]: esos nouesede, 3. Jh.v.Chr.) und Pisaurum (CIL XI 6297 = ILLRP 20: deiu no[ u] esede, 3./2. Jh.v.Chr.) widerspiegelt. Calpurnius Piso (fr. 45 HRR = 35 Forsythe) will vom Ursprung und Kult der Di N. im sabinischen Trebula Mutuesca wissen…

Mundus

(835 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt)
[German version] A subterranean pit, presumably expanded into a chamber, associated in Rome and othe…

Septemviri

(465 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt)
[German version] ('College of seven men'). Founded at Rome in 196 BC by resolution of the people, initially as a college of three men (Liv. 33,42,1), later (perhaps under L. Cornelius [I 90] Sulla) enlarged to seven, and finally, by Caesar, to ten members (Cass. Dio 43,51,9), the Roman urban priestly college known as the tresviri, later septemviri epulonum (e.g. InscrIt 13,2 p. 114 f.) or epulones ( epulo ; e.g. Liv. 33,42,1; Paul. Fest. 68 L.), took its name from its arrangement of the Iovis epulum , the sacrificial banquet ( ludorum epulare sacrificium: Cic. De or. 3,73) for Jupiter, Juno and Minerva during the ludi (III F) plebeii. A Iovis epulum during the ludi Romani is only reliably attested from the Augustan Period on, but the possibility cannot be entirely excluded that it took place from the mid 1st cent. BC [1. 285-289]. The septemviri also fulfilled a number of other cultic and administrative duties during the ludi from at least the 1st cent. BC (Cic. Har. resp. 21; [2. 398]). Nominally, the college of the septemviri was created to relieve the pontifical college (Pontifex) (Cic. De or. 3,73) and was subject to the latter's authority (Cic. Har. resp. 21; cf. Cass. Dio 48,32,4). It is not known whether its members were appointed by popular election in the late Republic, like those of other priestly colleges. Its foundation in the early 2nd cent. …

Pythioi

(195 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt)
[German version] (Πύθιοι/ Pýthioi). In the political organization of Sparta - according to tradition established by Lycurgus [4] - each of the two Spartan kings chose two ambassadors which were dispatched to obtain the oracles of Apollo Pythios in Delphi. In the Greek poleis, these ambassadors were usually called theoprópoi or theōroí; the name Pýthioi at Sparta thus reflects a special relationship between this polis and the Delphic oracle. The Pýthioi were allowed to dine in the skēnḕ dēmosía - at the expense of the dḗmos - as fellows in the kings' tent ( sýskēnoi) and at their table ( sýssit…

Pantheus

(1,113 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt)

Moles Martis

(151 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt)

Tritopatores

(155 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt)
[German version] (Τριτοπάτορες/ Tritopátores, also Τριτοπατρεῖς/ Tritopatreîs). The cultically worshipped ancestors - usually as a collective, but also individually (Τριτοπάτωρ/ Tritopátōr: IDélos 1,66) - of a particular social group. Cults of the T. of a pólis , of demes ( dêmos [2]), phratríai or génē (Family, IV. A. 3.) are recorded in Attica and on Attic-influenced Delos, in Selinus [4], Troezen and Cyrene. Several local inscriptional texts, primarily including a lex sacra from Selinus, give information about their cultic status. Philochorus (FGrH 328 F 182) in…

Maiesta

(147 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt)
[German version] According to Calpurnius Piso fr. 42 Peter = 10 Forsythe the wife of Volcanus, no other references. Assumed Oscian origin [1] contributes little to clarification. It is possible that Piso, against a contemporary identification of Maia as the wife of Volcanus and eponym of the month of May (conceivable with Gell. NA 13,23; Cincius fr. 8 GRF in Macrob. Sat. 1,12,18; Ov. Fast. 5,81-106), derives the name of the month from a goddess M., with M. for her part probably coming from Latin

Moneta

(635 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt)
[German version] Epithet of Juno. According to tradition, her Roman temple on the Arx (Capitolium) was vowed by L. Furius ([I 11], probably not [I 12]) Camillus in 345 BC (Liv. 7,28,4) and dedicated on 1 June 344 (Liv. 7,28,5f.; Ov. Fast. 6,183f.; Fasti Venusini, InscrIt 13,2, p. 58). The traditional story that the shrine was erected at the site of the house of M. Manlius [I 8] Capitolinus (e.g. Liv. 6,20,13; 7,28,5; Ov. Fast. 6,185f.) is based on its erroneous localization on the Arx. The source …

Scapegoat rituals

(740 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt)
[German version] 'SR' take their name from an ancient Israelite ritual sequence described in Lv 16,5-10 and 20-22, in which every year at Yom Kippur a ram was sacrificed to Yahweh and a second, on to which all the guilt of the people of Israel had been transferred, was driven into the wilderness "to take away divine anger"( ăzāzēl: [1. 159-162]). Post-Exile and, later, Jewish Rabbinic tradition explain Azazel as a demon or fallen angel, whereas early Christian theology interprets the ram as an allegory for Christ, who by his death is supposed to hav…

Volcanus

(1,070 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt)
[German version] is the original form of the name of the Roman god (CIL I2 453; Vetter No. 200B 6b; Volchanus: CIL I2 1218; Volganus: CIL I2 364; Volkanus: CIL IX 6349), the form Vulcanus is more recent. Attempts to trace this name back through the Etruscan Velch(ans) [1. 289-409] to a Cretan ελχάνος ( Welchános, or Zeus Velchanos) [1. 155-287] and thus to identify its origin in the eastern Mediterranean region are based primarily on linguistic similarities; the conclusion that Volcanus was therefore originally a god of vegetation is hypothetical …

Septerion

(307 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt)
[German version] (Σεπτήριον/ Septḗrion), not Stepterion (Στεπτήριον/ Steptḗrion), was the name of a nine-yearly sequence of festivals and rituals, in the course of which a boy would set fire to a wooden construction beneath the temple of Apollo in Delphi, would then himself be led in a procession into the Thessalian Tempe valley to be ritually purified there of his 'offence' with accompanying sacrifices in the river Peneius. A central constituent was the plucking at the sanctuary to Apollo there of a laurel branch, which the boy carried in a celebratory procession along a sacred route through the Delphic amphictyony (Amphiktyonia) and back to Delphi; the laurel wreaths woven in the Tempe valley are supposed to have been given to the winners of the subsequent Pythia [2] - before 586 BC these were also enneateric - (Theop. FGrH 115 F 80). In the ancient - rationalising and quite contradictory - mythographic tradition from the 4th century BC onwards (Theop. l.c.; Ephoros FGrH 70 F 31b; in detail: Plut. De def. or. 15,417e-418d) the S. was considered as the ritual representation of Apollo's killing of Python [1], the dragon (or person) that dwelt in a cave (or hut) in Delphi (or in the Tempe valley: Plut. Quaest. Graec. 12), of the ensuing wanderings of the god, his ritual purification in the Peneius and his return, laurel-wreathed, to Delphi. Since Antiquity there have been alternative but rather less convincing in…

Nomioi Theoi

(181 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt)
[German version] (Νόμιοι Θεοί; Nómioi Theoí). As an adjunct to νομεύς/ nomeús, ‘shepherd’, νόμιος/ nómios is a poetic apostrophe or actual cult invocation for the identification of groups of gods (anon. NT in Rome: IG XIV 1013) and individual gods in their function as pastoral deities. The following are addressed as Νόμιος/ Nómios: Hermes (Aristoph. Thesm. 977f.); Pan (Hom. H. 19,5; Paus. …

Vates

(519 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt)
[German version] Lat. 'announcer' of vaticinationes, 'prophecies', which occur by means of divine inspiration and are, according to Cicero, part of the 'natural' divination (Cic. Div. 1,4; 1,34 et passim; Divination VII: ill. of the communication pattern); occasionally, however, representatives of the 'artificial' divination (Haruspices; Augures) are also called vates (such as Liv. 2,42,10). The vates speaks in verse ( canere since Enn. Ann. 207; carmina: Sall. Hist. 1,77,3 et passim) and is thus pa…

Phylakterion

(1,299 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt)
[German version] (φυλακτήριον/ phylaktḗrion, literally 'means of protection') refers to a religious formula used to ask for pro…

Pudor

(165 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt)
[German version] As the social category of the human 'sense of shame', pudor is an element of Roman discourse on values from its earliest mention on (e.g. Plaut. Epid. 166). Yet only in the intensified moral discourses of the Augustan Period  - in imitation of the Greek a idṓs

Viriplaca

(180 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt)
[German version] V. is a goddess ( dea) of the city of Rome, recorded only in Val. Max. 2,1,6, whose small sanctuary ( sacellum) still stood on the Palatine at the time of Tiberius [II 1]: couples used to go there (but no longer in the time of Valerius Maximus) to resolve marriage difficulties by mutual exchange of their arguments. The name of the goddess was explained, entirely in the sense of a moralizing strategy by the author, with the etymology a placandis viris, 'from placating husbands'. With the aid of problematic 19th and 20th cent. religious and evolutionist categori…

Novensides, Di.

(514 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt)
[German version] A group of deities whose worship is reflected in the inscriptions of Marruvium (Vetter no. 225 = [1. 43-47 no. 36]:

Patera, Patella

(372 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt)
[German version] The patera was a flat, round dish without a handle, decorated from time to time, with a bulge ( omphalós) in the middle (like the Greek phiálē : [1. 42-44]) that was used as a drinking vessel (Plaut. Amph. 260; Prop. 4,6,85) and as a sacrificial bowl in the Roman cultural area (Varro, Ling. 5,122; fig. see Sacrifice IV.): from the

Sagmen

(69 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt)
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