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Delphus

(132 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Δελφός; Delphós). Hero who gave his name to  Delphi. He controlled the territory around Parnassus, when  Apollo, arriving from Delos, entered Delphi (Aesch. Eum. 16 with schol.). Apollo or Poseidon was mentioned as his father, and Melaena, Celaeno or Thyia as his mother (Paus. 10,6,3-5; schol. Eur. Or. 1094; Hyg. Fab. 161). In some accounts D. is said to have been the leader of the Cretans who came to Phocis and called themselves Delphi after him (Phylarchos FGrH 81 F 85). Delphi was also called Pytho after his son Pythes or his daughter Pythis (Paus.…

Deiphontes

(173 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Δηιφόντης; Dēiphóntēs). Great-great grandson of Heracles (Heracles-Ctessipus-Thrasyanor-Antimachus-D.). He married  Hyrnetho, daughter of the Heraclid  Temenus. The latter had been awarded Argos in the land lottery after the conquest of the Peloponnese. Temenus' sons, who felt neglected compared with D. and Hyrnetho, had their father killed. As he was dying, Temenus handed over rule to D. and Hyrnetho. But the Temenids did not relinquish their claims to power. For this reason D. m…

Brizo

(88 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Βριζώ; Brizṓ). A deity who predicted the future as a person lay sleeping. She was worshipped by Delian women as the protective goddess of boats. They brought her votive offerings in small barks which were not allowed to contain any fish. The name B. was derived from βρίζειν ( brízein, ‘to slumber’) (Semus of Delos in Ath. 8,335a-b = FGrH 396F4). B. is explained by [1] as a goddess who sends the wind and the waves to sleep. Bloch, René (Berne) Bibliography 1 H. Usener, Götternamen, 1896, 147.

Dryope

(212 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
(Δρυόπη; Dryópē). [German version] [1] Nymph, transformed into a tree Name of a nymph. Two widely diverging accounts exist of D.'s metamorphosis. According to Nik. in Antonius Liberalis 32, D. was the daughter of  Dryops and wife of  Andraemon [2]. She took onto her lap Apollo, who had been transformed into a tortoise, and subsequently gave birth to  Amphissus. D. was abducted by the nymphs with whom she played as a girl and to whose world she originally belonged. In her place, a black poplar and a spring…

Daedalion

(81 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Δαιδαλίων; Daidalíōn). Son of Heosphoros (Lucifer); brother of Ceyx; father of  Chione [2]. In his grief for the death of his only daughter, who scorned the beauty of Diana and was killed by her, he throws himself from the peak of Parnassus. Apollo, however, transforms him into a hawk (Ov. Met. 11,291-345; Hyg. Fab. 200). In Paus. 8,4,6 D. is the father of  Autolycus [1]. Bloch, René (Berne) Bibliography F. Bömer, Kommentar zu Ov. Met. B. X-XI, 1980, 313.

Elpis

(205 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Ἐλπίς; Elpís, from ἔλπομαι/ἐλπίζω; élpomai/elpízō, ‘expect, hope’). As a term and a character a vox media, which in its fundamentally neutral quality (‘expectation’) alternates between ‘hope’ (positive or false) and ─ less often ─ ‘apprehension’ (Pl. Leg. 644c; Hom. Od. 16,101; 19,84; Semonides fr. 1,6-7 IEG 2; Pind. Fr. 214). In Hes. Op. 90-105, the personified E. remains in  Pandora's box, while the other evil spirits (κακά; kaká) escape (cf. Babr. 58; [1; 2; 3]). According to Thgn. 1135-1146, E. was the only benevolent power to remain on eart…

Bonus Eventus

(116 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] A deity originally associated with agriculture; evenire and eventus designate the ripening of the fruits of the field. Varro (Rust. 1,1,6) considers that Bonus Eventus (BE) was one of the 12 rural gods. Later BE is generally understood as the bestower of success (Apul. Met. 4,2). Pliny (HN 34,77; 36,23) mentions two statues of BE in Rome: one by Euphranor and one by  Praxiteles. BE had a temple near the baths of Agrippa (Amm. Marc. 29,6,19). He is frequently portrayed on coins and cameos as a youth who holds in one hand a sacrificial bowl, in the other sheaves of grain. Bloch, Re…

Euneus

(158 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
(Εὔνηος; Eúnēos). [German version] [1] Great-grandson of Dionysus, warrior on both fronts in the Trojan War Lemnian ruler, son of Hypsipyle ( Lemnian women) and of Jason (Apollod. 1,115; Hyg. Fab. 15), brother of  Thoas [2], grandson of  Thoas [1] and great-grandson of  Dionysus. In the Trojan War he assisted both the Achaeans and the Trojans. While he was sending wine-laden ships to the former (Hom. Il 7,467-469), he bought freedom for Priamus' son Lycaon who was a prisoner of war (Hom. Il 23,746-747). ─ In Athens there was a ‘musicians' guild’ ( génos musikṓn) by the name of Euneidai …

Bisaltes

(85 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
(Βισάλτης; Bisáltēs). [German version] [1] Son of Helius and Ge Son of Helius (the Sun) and Ge (the Earth); the Macedonian city and region, Bisaltia, is named after him (Steph. Byz. s.v. Βισαλτία 170f.; Favorinos FHG 3,583f. [fr. 44]). Bloch, René (Berne) [German version] [2] Father of Theophane Father of  Theophane, who was courted by many suitors (Ov. Met. 6,117: Bisaltis). Her liaison with Poseidon produced the ram with the Golden Fleece that carried Phrixus to Colchis (Hyg. Fab. 188). Bloch, René (Berne)

Erigone

(248 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
(Ἠριγόνη; Ērigónē). Name of two similar figures of Attic mythology: [German version] [1] Suicide, daughter of Icarius, welcomer of Dionysus Daughter of  Icarius, who had given Dionysus a hospitable reception and, for this, had received as a present the knowledge of making wine. When Icarius, on behalf of Dionysus, tried to introduce viticulture, he was killed by the farmers who thought they had been poisoned after they had drunk unblended wine. E. was led to her father's body by the dog Maera and thereupon hanged h…

Enceladus

(103 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Ἐγκέλαδος; Enkélados, ‘The Raging One’, from κελαδέω; keladéō; EM. s.v. E. 310,35 Gaisford; Hsch. s.v. E.). One of the  giants, son of Tartarus and Ge (Hyg. Fab. praef. 4). He fought against Zeus (Batr. 283), Dionysus (Eur. Cycl.5-9) and─according to the most widely disseminated version─Athene, who threw the island of Sicily or Mt. Aetna on him (Callim. Fr. 1,36; Eur. HF 907-909; Apollod. 1,37; Verg. Aen. 3,578). He is commonly represented in the visual arts [1]. Bloch, René (Berne) Bibliography 1 F. Vian, s.v. E., LIMC 3.1, 742-743. R. Rocca, s.v. E., EV 2, 217-218 F. …

Chryseis

(116 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Χρυσηίς; Chrysēís). Etymology ‘girl from  Chryse’ or ‘daughter of Chryses’. The daughter of the Apollo priest Chryses who was captured by  Achilles in Thebes and allotted to Agamemnon as a slave. When Chryses pleaded with Agamemnon to have C. returned, he was refused. On Chryses' prayer Apollo forced the return of C. by sending a plague. Agamemnon then demanded Achilles' captive  Briseis as a substitute and, thus, incurred his anger (Hom. Il. 1). According to schol. Il. 1,392 C. w…

Chrysippe

(23 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Χρυσίππη; Chrysíppē). Danaid who killed her spouse Chrysippus, son of Aegyptus (Apollod. 2,18; Hyg. Fab. 170). Bloch, René (Berne)

Elymus

(77 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] Trojan, eponymous forefather of the  Elymi. He came to Sicily either with Aegestus (Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 1,47; 52f.; Tzetz. schol. Lycoph. 965) or Aeneas (Str.13,1,53), and settled in the region around the  Eryx. Virgil, who refers to him as Helymus, depicts him as the winner in a competition (Verg. Aen. 5,73; 323). According to Serv. Aen. 5,73, he was the founder of the cities of Asca, Entella, and Egesta. Bloch, René (Berne)

Eleos

(121 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Ἔλεος; Éleos). ‘Compassion’. Appears personified in Timocles fr. 33 PCG. An altar dedicated to E. stood on a market square in Athens (Paus. 1,17,1; Diod. Sic. 13,22,7) [1], a well-known  asylon/asylum (Lucian Demonax 57 and schol.; Schol. Aeschin. 2,15). According to Apollod. 2,167, it was there that the Heraclides sought refuge, according to Philostr. Epistula 39, they even appear as the founders of the altar. According to Aristotle's poetic theory, through éleos and phóbos (‘pity and fear’), tragedy should lead to  katharsis (Aristot. Poet. 5, 1449 …

Diotima

(171 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Διοτίμα; Diotíma). In the introduction of his discourse on Eros in Plato's Symposium (201d), Socrates claims that he would only pass on what he had learned from D., a wise priestess from Mantinea, who allegedly obtained for Athens a ten-year moratorium of the plague from the gods. The dialogue of the Symposium is thus interrupted. The D.-interlude consists of two parts: the first explains the nature of Eros, the second his power. In his epilogue, Socrates indicates his conviction that these teachings are correct. It is impossible…

Doto

(66 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Δωτώ; Dōtṓ). Feminine short form, presumably understood as ‘the giver’ [1] (cf. δώτωρ, δωτήρ, δώτης etc.). One of the  Nereids (Hom. Il. 18,43; Hes. Theog. 248; Apollod. 1,11; Verg. Aen. 9,102; Hyg. Fab. praef. 8; IG XIV 2519). She occupied a sanctuary in the Syrian coastal town of Gabala (Paus. 2,1,8). Bloch, René (Berne) Bibliography 1 Kamptz, 126. G. Garbugino, s.v. D., EV 2, 137.

Dryops

(116 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Δρύοψ; Drýops, ‘man of oak’). Gave his name to the Dryopians [1]; son of the river  Spercheus and the Danaid Polydora, or of Apollo and  Dia [3], daughter of the Arcadian Lycaon. D. himself was also thought to be an Arcadian (Str. 8,6,13; Pherecydes FGrH 3 F 8; Nik. in Ant. Lib. 32; Tzetz. Lycoph. 480). One of his daughters bore Pan to Hermes (Hom. h. 19,33-39). D. had a cult (temple with statue) in the Dryopian town of Asine in Messenia (Paus. 4,34,11), whence occasional coins showing D. [2]. Bloch, René (Berne) Bibliography 1 I. Malkin, Myth and Territory in the Spartan…

Deiopites

(41 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Δηιοπίτης; Dēiopítēs). Trojan, son of  Priamus (Apollod. 3,153; Hyg. Fab. 90,6). Wounded by Odysseus (Hom. Il. 11,420); according to Dictys 3,7 killed by Agamemnon. Bloch, René (Berne) Bibliography P. Wathelet, Dictionnaire des Troyens de l'Iliade, 1988, vol. 1, 414f.

Candaules

(156 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Κανδαύλης; Kandaúlēs). According to Hdt. 1.7-12, the last ruler of the Heraclid dynasty in Lydian Sardis. The Greeks also called him Myrsilus after his father Myrsus. C. allowed his faithful retainer  Gyges [1] to see his wife naked so that he would be convinced of her beauty. He was then murdered by Gyges after C.'s wife confronted him with the choice of suicide as an alternative. A dramatic version of this material can be glimpsed from the remnants of the text (TrGF II Adespota …
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