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K̲h̲araḳānī

(2,262 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, Abu ’l-Ḥasan ʿAlī b. Aḥmad , Persian mystic who died on the 10th Muḥarram 425/5th December 1033 at the age of 73. The nisba refers to the village of K̲h̲araḳān situated in the mountains to the north of Bisṭām on the road to Astarābād (modern Gurgān). There are several variants for the vocalisation of this place-name even in the early sources for the life of this mystic. This confusion may very well be the result of the existence of other place names with the same consonant outline, such as K̲h̲a…

Takī Awḥadī

(447 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, or Taḳī al-Dīn Muḥammad al-Ḥusaynī al-Awḥadī, Persian anthologist, lexicographer and poet. He was born at Iṣfahān on 3 Muḥarram 973/31 January 1565, into a family with a Ṣūfī tradition from Balyān in Fārs. One of his paternal ancestors was the 5th/11th-century S̲h̲ayk̲h̲ Abū ʿAlī al-Daḳḳāḳ. During his adolescence he studied in S̲h̲īrāz, where he presented his early poems to a circle of poets and was encouraged by ʿUrfī [ q.v.]. Returning to Iṣfahān, he attracted the attention of the young S̲h̲āh ʿAbbās I and joined his entourage. In 1003/1594-5, Taḳī retired for six years to the ʿatabāt

Labībī

(454 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, the pen-name of a Persian poet who lived at the end of the 4th/11th and the beginning of the 5th/12th century. His personal name as well as almost any other particulars of his life are unknown. The Tard̲j̲umān al-balāg̲h̲a has preserved an elegy by Labībī on the death of Farruk̲h̲ī [ q.v.], which means that the former was probably still alive in 429/1037-8. A ḳaṣīda attributed to him by ʿAwfī is addressed to a mamdūḥ by the name of Abu ’l-Muẓaffar, who in that source is identified with a younger brother of the G̲h̲aznavid Sultan Maḥmūd. But it i…

Rind

(809 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
(p.), a word applied in Persian with a contemptuous connotation to “a knave, a rogue, a drunkard” or “a debauchee”; in the terminology of poets and mystics it acquired the positive meaning of “one whose exterior is liable to censure, but who at heart is sound” (Steingass, s.v., after the Burhān-i ḳāṭiʿ ). The etymology of rind is unclear. It is not an Arabic loanword, in spite of the existence of the broken plural runūd , a learned form used next to the regular Persian plural rindān . The abstract noun rindī denotes the characteristic behaviour of a person thus qualified. Mediaeval historians r…

Sām

(1,147 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, legendary ruler of Sīstān [ q.v.] and vassal of the Kayānids, the epic kings of Īrān, was, according to al-T̲h̲aʿālibī and Firdawsī, the son of Narīmān, the father of Zāl-Dastān and the grandfather of Rustam [ q.v.]. This pedigree is the outcome of a long development spanning the entire history of the Iranian epic. In the Avesta, Sāma is the name of a clan to which T̲h̲rīta, “the third man who pressed the Haoma”, belonged as well as his sons Urvāk̲h̲s̲h̲aya and Kərəsāspa (Yasna 9. 10). Kərəsāspa (Persian Kars̲h̲āsp or Gars̲h̲āsp)…

Nūr al-Ḥaḳḳ al-Dihlawī

(269 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, or Nūr al-Dīn Muḥammad al-S̲h̲āhd̲j̲ahānābādī, a traditionist and historiographer of Mug̲h̲al India who flourished in the 11th/17th century. The nickname “al Turk al-Buk̲h̲ārī” points to his origin from Central Asia. As a poet he adopted the pen name “Mas̲h̲riḳī”. He was the son of the scholar ʿAbd al-Ḥaḳḳ [ q.v.] al-Dihlawī, a well-known s̲h̲ayk̲h̲ of the Ḳādiriyya order. Nūr al-Ḥaḳḳ succeeded his father as a religious teacher and was appointed a judge at Agra under S̲h̲āh D̲j̲ahān. His death at Dihlī occurred in 1073/1662. In Zubdat al-tawārīk̲h̲ , Nūr al-Ḥaḳḳ enlarged the Tārīk̲h̲-…

Nāma

(445 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
(p.). a Persian word, derived as an adjective from the common Iranian root nāman- , “name”. Already in Middle Persian the form nāmag can be ¶ found also as a substantive referring to an inscription, a letter or a book. In the orthography of Pahlavī, the word could be written either phonemically, as n’mk’, or by means of any of two heterographs: S̲H̲M-k’, which was based on the Semitic word for “name”, and MGLT’, i.e. the Aramaic m e gill e ta , “scroll” (cf. L. Koehler and W. Baumgartner, Lexicon in Veteris Testamenti libros , Leiden 1953, 1091). It occurs also in co…

Maḥmūd B. ʿAbd al-Karīm b. Yaḥyā S̲h̲abistarī

(1,188 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, (or S̲h̲abustarī , according to modern Azeri writers) S̲h̲ayk̲h̲ Saʿd al-Dīn, Persian mystic and writer. He was born at S̲h̲abistar, a small town near the north-eastern shore of Lake Urmiya. The date of his birth is unknown, but would have to be fixed about 686/1287-8 if the report that he died at the age of 33 (mentioned in an inscription on a tombstone erected on his grave in the 19th century) is accepted. He is said to have led the life of a prominent religious scholar at Tabrīz. Travels to Egypt, Syria and the Ḥid̲j̲āz are mentioned in the introduction to the Saʿādat-nāma

S̲h̲ahriyār

(547 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, Sayyid (or Mīr) Muḥammad Ḥusayn , a modern Persian poet. He was born about 1905 at Tabrīz as the son of a lawyer, and belonging to a family of sayyid s in the village of K̲h̲us̲h̲gnāb. In his early work he used the pen name Bahd̲j̲at, which he later changed to S̲h̲ahriyār, a name chosen from the Dīwān of Ḥāfiẓ, who was his great model as a writer of g̲h̲azal s. He read medicine at the Dār al-Funūn in Tehran, but left his studies unfinished to become a government clerk in K̲h̲urāsān. After some time he returned to Tehran, where for many years…

Nizārī Ḳuhistānī

(754 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, Ḥakīm Saʿd al-Dīn b. S̲h̲ams al-dīn Muḥammad poète persan, né en 647/1247-8 à Bīrd̲j̲and [ q.v.], où il mourut en 720/1320. Nizārī n’était pas seulement son pseudonyme en tant que poète, mais aussi une indication de la loyauté de sa famille à l’égard de Nizār [ q.v.] qui, à la fin du Ve/XIe siècle, prétendit à l’imāmat fāṭimide avec le soutien de la plupart des Ismāʿīliens persans. Les seules données biographiques doivent être tirées de ses propres oeuvres. D’après Borodin, suivi par Rypka, il aurait été attaché à la cour des Maliks Kart de Harā…

Muḥtas̲h̲am-i Kās̲h̲ānī

(875 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, S̲h̲ams al-S̲h̲uʿarāʾ Kamāl al-Dīn , Persian poet of the early Ṣafawid period, born ca. 1500 in Kās̲h̲ān. According to the most reliable sources, he died in 996/1587-8; a ¶ less likely dating of his death, given by Abū Ṭālib Iṣfahānī in K̲h̲ulāṣat al-afkār (see Storey i/2, 878), is 1000/1591-2. For some time he was a draper ( bazzāz ) like his father, but he abandoned this trade for the more profitable career of a professional poet. His work was appreciated at the Ṣafawid court at Ḳazwīn. He seems to have continued, however, to l…

ʿUbayd-I Zākānī

(909 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. De
, or Niẓām al-Dīn ʿUbayd Allāh al-Zākānī, Persian poet of the Mongol period who became especially famous for his satires and parodies. He was born into a family of scholars and state officials descending from Arabs of the Banū Ḵh̲afād̲j̲a [ q.v.] settled in the area of Ḳazwīn since early Islamic times. In 730/1329-30 the historian Ḥamd Allāh Mustawfī described him as a talented poet and a writer of learned treatises. A collection of Arabic sayings by prophets and wise men, entitled Nawādir al-amt̲h̲āl , belongs to this early period. When later in the same …

Malik al-S̲h̲uʿarāʾ

(980 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
(a.), “King of the Poets”, honorific title of a Persian poet laureate, which is also known in other forms. It was the highest distinction which could be given to a poet by a royal patron. Like other honorifics [see laḳab ], it confirmed the status of its holder within his profession and was regarded as a permanent addition to his name which sometimes even became a hereditary title. Corresponding to this on a lower level was the privilege, given occasionally to court poets, of choosing a pen name [see tak̲h̲alluṣ ] based on the name or one of the laḳab s of their patron. Certain responsibilities we…

Rāmī Tabrīzī

(612 words)

Author(s): Berthels, E. | Bruijn, J. T. P. de
, S̲h̲araf al-dīn Ḥasan b. ¶ Muḥammad, poète et rhétoricien persan dont l’activité se situe au milieu du VIIIe/XIVe siècle. On ne sait que très peu de chose sur sa vie, et les rares indications que nous avons sont imprécises ou bien ne sont pas fiables. Dawlats̲h̲āh déclare qu’il fut poète lauréat ( malik al-s̲h̲uʿarāʾ [ q.v.]) du ʿIrāḳ pendant le règne du Muẓaffaride S̲h̲āh Manṣūr (règn. 789-95/1387-93), mais les dédicaces de ses deux œuvres les plus importantes prouvent qu’il fréquenta la cour du sultan Abū l-Fatḥ Uways Bahādur dit aussi S̲h̲ayk̲h̲…

Muṣannifak

(317 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, ʿAlāʾ al-dīn ʿAlī b. Mad̲j̲d al-dīn Muḥammad al-Biṣtāmī (ou al-Harawī), écrivain et théologien persan. Il naquit en 803/1400-1 à S̲h̲āhrūd, près de Bisṭām, dans une famille descendant du fameux théologien Fak̲h̲r al-dīn al-Rāzī [ q.v.]. Le surnom de Muṣannifak «le petit écrivain» lui fut probablement donné «par allusion à son œuvre précoce d’écrivain» (Storey). Il étudia à Harāt et demeura dans la Perse orientale jusqu’en 848/1444, date à laquelle il se rendit en Anatolie, Alors qu’il enseignait à Ḳonya, son ouïe se détériora a…

Taḳī Awḥadī

(451 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, ou Taḳī al-dīn Muḥammad al-Ḥusaynī al-Awḥadī, auteur d’anthologies, lexicographe et poète persan. Né à Iṣfahān le 3 Muḥarram 973/31 Janvier 1565, d’une famille de tradition ṣūfie originaire de Balyān, dans le Fārs. Il eut pour ancêtre du côté de son père, S̲h̲ayk̲h̲ Abū ʿAlī al-Daḳḳāḳ, au Ve/XIe siècle. Au cours de son adolescence, il étudia à S̲h̲īrāz, où il présenta ses premiers poèmes à un cercle de poètes et il fut encouragé par ʿUrfī [ q.v.]. De retour à Iṣfahān, il attira l’attention du jeune S̲h̲āh ʿAbbās Ier et rejoignit ses familiers. En 1003/1594-5, Taḳī se retira pour …

K̲h̲araḳānī

(2,077 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, Abū l-Ḥasan ʿAlī b. Aḥmad, mystique persan, m. le 10 muḥarram 425/5 décembre 1033 à l’âge de 73 ans. Sa nisba vient du village de Ḵh̲araḳān situé dans les montagnes au Nord de Bisṭām, sur la route d’Astarābād (mod. Gurgān); ce nom de lieu est diversement vocalisé, même dans les sources anciennes relatives à la vie de ce mystique, et la confusion peut fort bien provenir de l’existence d’autres toponymes dont le ductus consonantique est le même, notamment Ḵh̲arḳān, près de Samarḳand, et Ḵh̲anaḳān, entre Hamadān et Ḳazwīn. Dans les poèmes de ʿAṭṭār, la nisba de ce mystique est uniformément…

K̲h̲argird

(801 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
ou Ḵh̲ard̲j̲ird était le nom d’au moins deux localités du Nord-est de la Perse, mais il n’est plus donné aujourd’hui qu’à une seule d’entre elles. I. Ḵh̲argird, dans le s̲h̲ahristān de Turbat-i Ḥaydariyya ou, plus précisément, le dihistān de Rūd-i miyān-i Ḵh̲wāf, est située à environ 6 km. au Sud-ouest de cette dernière ville. C’est maintenant une petite agglomération dont les habitants vivent de la culture des céréales et du coton ainsi que du tissage. Des vestiges archéologiques trahissent cependant un passé beaucoup plus prospère, a…

Sām

(1,123 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, souverain légendaire du Sīstān [ q.v.] et vassal des Kayānides, rois épiques de l’Īran, était, ¶ selon al-T̲h̲aʿālibī et Firdawsī, le fils de Narīmān, le père de Zāl-Dastān et le grand-père de Rustam [ q.v.]. Cette lignée est le résultat d’un long développement qui recouvre l’histoire entière de l’épopée iranienne. Dans l’Avesta, Sāma est le nom d’un clan auquel appartenait T̲h̲rīta, «le troisième homme qui exprima l’Haoma», ainsi que ses fils Urvāk̲h̲s̲h̲aya et Kərəsāspa (Yasna, 9.10). Kərəsāspa (persan Kars̲h̲āsp ou Gars̲h̲ās…

S̲h̲ams-i Ḳays

(979 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, forme courante du nom S̲h̲ams al-dīn Muḥammad b. Ḳays Rāzī, auteur du plus ancien ouvrage sur la poétique en persan, al-Muʿd̲j̲am fī maʿāyīr as̲h̲ʿār al-ʿAd̲j̲am, qui recouvre la gamme complète de l’érudition littéraire traditionnelle. Les seuls éléments que l’on possède sur sa vie sont issus de ses propres affirmations, provenant pour la plupart de l’introduction du seul de ses ouvrages qui ait subsisté ( Muʿd̲j̲am, 2-24). Sa ville natale était Rayy, où il est sans doute né autour du début du dernier quart du XIe siècle. Il vécut de nombreuses années en Transoxiane, au Ḵh̲wārazm et dan…
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