Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Caskel, W." ) OR dc_contributor:( "Caskel, W." )' returned 25 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Bāhila

(775 words)

Author(s): Caskel, W.
A settled and semi-settled tribe in ancient Arabia. The centre of their territory, Sūd Bāhila (Saud? — “corrected” in Hamdānī by an uninformed copyist into Sawād), extended on both sides of the direct route (described by Philby in The Heart of Arabia , vol. ii) from Riyad to Mecca. It is sufficiently well defined by the localities al-Ḳuwayʿ, D̲j̲azālā = Juzaila, al-Ḥufayr = Hufaira and the mountains al-Ḳatid = al-D̲j̲idd and (Ibnā) Shamāmi = Idhnain Shamal. The clan Ḏj̲iʾāwa (D̲j̲āwa) lived further westward at the …

ʿAdnān

(298 words)

Author(s): Caskel, W.
, ancestor of the Northern Arabs according to the genealogical system which received its final form in the work of Ibn al-Kalbī, about 800 A.D. The name occurs twice in Nabatean inscriptions from N.W. Arabia (ʿAbd ʿAdnōn, ʿAdnon; Jaussen et Savignac, Mission Archéologique en Arabie , Paris 1909-14, nos. 38, 328) also in Thamudic (Lankester Harding/Littmann, Some Thamudic Inscriptions , Leiden 1952) and was taken to South Arabia along the incense-route ( Corpus Inscriptionum Semit ., iv, no. 808). As already noted by al-Ḏj̲umaḥī, Ṭabaḳāt (Hell), 5 (cf. also Ibn ʿAbd al-Barr, al-Inbāh ʿa…

Ad̲j̲aʾ and Salmā

(175 words)

Author(s): Caskel, W.
, the two main ranges of the central Arabian mountain group of Ḏj̲abalā Ṭayyiʾ, modern al-Ḏj̲abal. An old tale of the type of “metamorphosis as punishment for sin” is attached to them; the tale is connected with reality insofar as Ad̲j̲aʾ and Salmā occur in Old Arabic and in early North Arabic dialects as personal names.—According to Ibn al-Kalbī’s “Book of Idols”, and one of the two versions in the Ḏj̲amhara by the same author, the God Fals/Fils/Fulus was worshipped in the guise of one of the cliffs of Ad̲j̲aʾ. This cult is probably of great…

ʿĀmir b. Ṣaʿṣaʿa

(1,183 words)

Author(s): Caskel, W.
, a large group of tribes in Western Central Arabia. It is mentioned first in a South Arabian inscription of Abraha in 547 or 544-45 (G. Ryckmans, No. 506, in Le Muséon , 1953; J. Ryckmans, ibid., 339-42; Caskel, Entdeckungen in Arabien , 1954, 27-31). Judging by that inscription and by the later area of the ʿĀmir, their original area began to the west of the Turaba oasis and extended towards the east, past Ranya, to the upland south of the Riyāḍ-Mecca road. Here it ended at about the 44th degree of longitude, but …

Bakr b. Wāʾil

(2,372 words)

Author(s): Caskel, W.
ancient Arabic group of tribes in Central, East, and (Later) Northern Arabia. The Bakr belonged to the same people—later known as Rabīʿa—as the ʿAbd al-Ḳays [ q.v.]. Their place in the tribal genealogy is three grades lower than that of these. The T̲h̲aʿlaba (b. ʿUkāba) are to be regarded ¶ as the core of the Bakr. Joshua Stylites (§ 57) mentions them under the year 503 as being the leading tribe of the northem Arabian Kinda Empire, and shortly afterwards they appear in a South Arabian inscription (Ryckmans 510, Le Muséon 1953). In the genealogy of Bakr, the T̲h…

Ḍabba

(709 words)

Author(s): Caskel, W.
b. Udd b. Ṭābīk̲h̲a b. al-Yās ( K̲h̲indif ) b. Muḍar b. Nizār b. Maʿadd was the eponymous hero of the well known Arab tribe of that name. With their “nephews” ʿUkl b. ʿAwf, Taym, ʿAdī, and T̲h̲awr b. ʿAbd Manāt b. Udd, Ḍabba formed a confederacy called al-Ribāb. The Ribāb were in alliance with Saʿd b. Zayd Manāt, the greatest clan of Tamīm. This alliance has never been broken by the other confederates. These, indeed, were formations of rather moderate size, whereas the Ḍabba by means of their power sometimes were able to follow their own policy. Of the three clans of Ḍabba, Ṣuraym had in the…

al-Aʿs̲h̲ā

(851 words)

Author(s): Caskel, W.
, maymūn b. ḳays . Prominent ancient Arab poet of the tribe of Ḳays b. T̲h̲aʿlaba of the Bakr b. Wāʾil [ q.v.]. Born before 570 in Durnā, a place in the Manfūḥa oasis (south of Riyāḍ), died in the same place after 625. As his cognomen indicates, he suffered from an eye disease, and went completely blind whilst still in the prime of life. He set out in search of wealth in his youth. For years he travelled, probably as a merchant, and visited Upper and Lower Mesopotamia, Syria, southern Arabia, and Abyssinia in this wa…

ʿĀmir b. al-Ṭufayl

(577 words)

Author(s): Caskel, W.
, ancient Arab hero and poet, sprung from the Mālik, the younger line of the Ḏj̲aʿfar b. Kilāb, belonging to ʿĀmir b. Ṣaʿṣaʿa. In the nineties and past the threshold of the 7th century he took part in many marauding expeditions, sometimes leading his own men. After the death of his father, who appears to have fallen in the south fighting against the Ḵh̲at̲h̲ʿam, he took over the conduct of the war until the loss of an eye at the battle of Fayf al-Rīḥ (against the Ḵh̲at̲h̲ʿam, ca. 614) rendered h…

ʿAbd al-Ḳays

(1,890 words)

Author(s): Caskel, W.
(rarely ʿAbd Ḳays), i.e. "Servant of (the god) Ḳays", old Arabian tribe in East Arabia. The nisba is ʿAbdī and ʿAbḳasī. ʿAbd al-Ḳays belongs to a group of tribes once settled in the modern province of al-ʿĀriḍ, whence it advanced to the North-West as far as present-day Sudayr and to the South-East as far as al-Ḵh̲ard̲j̲. This group was later, in the genealogy of the Northern Arabs, given the name of Rabīʿa [ q.v.]. Already in the 5th century parts of this group detached themselves and started to nomadize partly within, partly beyond the arch of the Ṭuwayḳ. To the lat…

ʿAkk

(415 words)

Author(s): Caskel, W.
, old Arabian tribe, probably identical with the ’Αγχιται (’Αχχιται) of Ptolemy, vi, 7, § 23. H. Reckendorf considered the name ʿAkk as a place-name; but it occurs as a personal name in T̲h̲amūdic inscriptions. At the beginning of the 7th century the territory of the ʿAkk in the Tihāma of Yaman stretched from Wādī Mawr, over Surdud, to Wādī Sahām (i.e. between modern Luḥayya and Ḥudayda), where it met that of the As̲h̲ʿar. At that time they ¶ participated in the Meccan cult. Earlier a colony of the ʿAkk was to be found in ʿAḳīḳ (Tamra) = Wādī al-Dawāsir. No information is…

al-Aʿs̲h̲ā

(863 words)

Author(s): Caskel, W.
, Maymūn b. Ḳays. Kminent poète arabe de la tribu de Ḳays b. T̲h̲aʿlaba, des Bakr b. Wāʾil [ q.v.]. Né avant 570 à Durnā, hameau de "oasis de Manfūḥa (au Sud de Riyāḍ), mort au même endroit après 625. 11 souffrait d’une maladie des yeux, comme en témoigne son surnom, et devint aveugle dans son âge mûr. L’avidité l’entraîna très tôt à l’étranger. Pendant de longues années, il voyagea probablement comme marchand en haute et basse Mésopotamie, en Syrie, en Arabie du Sud et jusqu’en Abyssinie. A partir du moment où il…

Asad

(225 words)

Author(s): Caskel, W.
, ancient Arab tribe. The Ασατηνοι mentioned by Ptolemy VI, 7, § 22 (Sprenger, 206), and stated by him to have lived in central Arabia, to the west of the Θανουιται = Tanūk̲h̲ [ q.v.]. Like them, and perhaps with them, the Asad had emigrated to the Euphrates line before the middle of the 3rd century. They appear in the inscription on the grave of the second Lak̲h̲mid of Ḥīra (in al-Numāra, 328 A.D.), together with the Tanūk̲h̲, as al-Asadayn, "the two Asads". Here the dual a potiori may well have been chosen in order to erase, together with the name, the memory of the Tanūk̲h̲ rul…

ʿAkk

(411 words)

Author(s): Caskel, W.
, ancienne tribu Arabe, probablement identique aux ’Aƴκɩταɩ (’Aκκɩταɩ) Ptolémée, VI, 7, § 23. H. Reckendorf considérait le terme ʿAkk comme un nom de lieu; mais il apparaît comme un nom de personne dans des inscriptions t̲h̲amūdiques. Au commencement du VIIe siècle, le territoire des ʿAkk s’étendait dans la Tihāma du Yémen, de Wādī Mawr, au delà de Surdud jusqu’à Wādī Sahām (c’est à-dire entre Luḥayya et Ḥudayda d’aujourd’hui), où il rejoignait celui des As̲h̲ʿar. A cette époque ils participaient au culte mekkois. Antérieurement, une …

Ḍabba

(746 words)

Author(s): Caskel, W.
b. Udd b. Ṭābik̲h̲a b. al-Yās (K̲h̲indif) b. Muḍar b. Nizār b. Maʿadd, héros éponyme de la tribu arabe bien connue du même nom. Avec leurs «neveux», ʿUkl b. ʿAwf, Taym, ʿAdī et T̲h̲awr b. ʿAbd Manāt b. Udd, les Ḍabba formaient une confédération qui portait le nom d’al-Ribāb. Les Ribāb étaient alliés aux Sa’d b. Zayd Manāt, la fraction ¶ la plus importante des Tamīm. Cette alliance ne fut jamais rompue par les autres confédérés. Ceux-ci, il est vrai, étaient des groupements modestes, tandis que les Ḍabba, grâce à leur puissance, furent parfois capables d’avoir une politique indépendante. Des t…

Ad̲j̲aʾ et Salmā

(189 words)

Author(s): Caskel, W.
, les deux principales chaînes du bloc montagneux au centre de l’Arabie du Nord, Ḏj̲abalā Ṭayyiʾ, aujourd’hui al-Ḏj̲abal. Il s’y rattache une vieille légende du genre «métamorphose à titre de sanction pour un crime commis»; cette légende correspond à la réalité dans la mesure où Ad̲j̲aʾ et Salmā sont attestés comme noms propres en vieil arabe et dans les anciens dialectes du Nord. D’après le Livre des idoles d’Ibn al-Kalbī, ainsi que d’après l’une des deux recensions de la Ḏj̲amhara du même auteur, le dieu Fals/Fils/Fulus aurait été adoré sous la forme d’une excroissance d…

Bāhila

(757 words)

Author(s): Caskel, W.
, tribu sédentaire et semi-sédentaire de l’Arabie ancienne. Le centre de son territoire, Sūd Bāhila (Saud?—«corrigé» en Sawād dans al-Hamdānī par un copiste mal informé), s’étendait des deux côtés de la route directe de Riyāḍ à la Mekke, décrite par Philby dans The Heart of Arabia, II. Il est assez bien délimité par les localités d’al-Kuwayʿ, Ḏj̲azāla = Juzaila, al-Ḥufayr = Hufaira et les monts al-Ḳatid = al-Ḏj̲idd et (Ibnā) S̲h̲amāmi = Idhnain Shamal. La sous-tribu des Ḏj̲iʾāwa (Djāwa) vivait, plus à l’Ouest, au pied du versant occidental…

ʿAbd al-Ḳays

(1,920 words)

Author(s): Caskel, W.
(rarement ʿAbd Ḳays), c.-à-d. «serviteur du (Dieu) Ḳays», ancienne confédération de tribus arabes d’Arabie Orientale. Nisba: ʿAbdī et ʿAbḳasī. Les ʿAbd al-Ḳays appartiennent à un groupe de tribus qui se constitua dans la province moderne de ʿĀriḍ, puis s’étendit vers le Nord-Ouest jusqu’à l’actuel Sudayr, et vers le Sud-Est jusqu’à al-Ḵh̲ard̲j̲. Plus tard, dans l’arbre généalogique des Arabes du Nord, ce groupe fut désigné sous le nom de Rabīʿa [ q.v.]. Dès le Ve siècle, des fractions commencèrent à se détacher de ce groupe et à nomadiser partie en deçà, partie au de…

Bakr b. Wāʾil

(2,495 words)

Author(s): Caskel, W.
, ancienne confédération de tribus arabes du Centre, de l’Est, et, plus tard, du Nord de l’Arabie. Les Bakr appartenaient au même groupe, appelé par la suite Rabīʿa, que les ʿAbd al-Ḳays [ q.v.]. Dans la généalogie du groupe, leur branche se situe trois degrés plus bas que celle des ʿAbd al-Ḳays. On peut considérer les T̲h̲aʿlaba (b. ʿUkāba) comme le noyau même des Bakr. Ils formaient la tribu prépondérante de l’empire Kinda de l’Arabie du Nord d’après Joshua Stylites (§ 57), en 503, et on les trouve peu après mentionnés dans une inscription sud-arabique (Ryckmans 510: Le Muséon 1953). Dans …

ʿĀmir b. al-Ṭufayl

(607 words)

Author(s): Caskel, W.
, héros et poète de l’Arabie ancienne, issu des Mālik, branche cadette des Ḏj̲aʿfar b. Kilāb, appartenant eux-mêmes aux ʿĀmir b. Ṣaʿṣaʿa [ q.v.]. Dans la dernière décennie du VIe siècle, et dans les premières années du VIIe, il prit part à un grand nombre de razzias, parfois avec sa propre équipe. Après la mort de son père, qui semble avoir perdu la vie dans le Sud, au cours d’un combat contre les Ḵh̲at̲h̲ʿam, il prit en personne le commandement, jusqu’à ce que la perte d’un œil à la bataille de Fayf al-Rīḥ (vers 614, contre les Ḵh…

ʿĀmir b. Ṣaʿṣaʿa

(1,181 words)

Author(s): Caskel, W.
Grande confédération de tribus en Arabie du centre-ouest. On en trouve ¶ mention pour la première fois dans une inscription sud-arabique d’Abraha datant de 547 ou de 544-45 (G. Ryckmans, n° 506, le Muséon, 1953; J. Ryckmans, ibid., 339-42; Caskel, Entdeckungen in Arabien, 1954, 27-31). A en juger par cette inscription et par les limites ultérieures du territoire de transhumance des ʿĀmir, ce territoire commençait primitivement à l’Ouest de l’oasis de Turaba et s’étendait vers l’Est en passant par Ranya jusqu’à la région montagneuse au S…
▲   Back to top   ▲