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Intensifiers

(2,268 words)

Author(s): Egle Mocciaro
Abstract In Ancient Greek, the prototypical intensifier is the demonstrative pronoun autós, whose intensive (or emphatic) function has been widely recognized already in the traditional literature. Recent research, carried out within the functional framework, shows that the Greek intensifier can be analyzed on the basis of new insights of the typological literature. From this perspective, intensifiers have been accounted for as a sub-class of functional words, widely attested in the languages of the world, …
Date: 2013-11-01

Auxiliaries

(2,416 words)

Author(s): Egle Mocciaro
Abstract The prototypical auxiliary in Ancient Greek is eimí ‘to be’, which is involved in certain participial periphrases conveying aspectual value and variously interacting with the synthetic forms within the inflectional paradigm. However, many other verbs are involved in Greek periphrastic constructions, although their status as auxiliaries is still a matter of debate. Recent research on grammaticalization allows us to describe the entire range of such verbs in prototype terms, that is, as a coheren…
Date: 2013-11-01

Reflexives

(2,868 words)

Author(s): Egle Mocciaro
Abstract Ancient Greek had a pronominal reflexive strategy, which underwent some significant changes over time. These diachronic changes are here described by using the analytical tools elaborated within the functional frameworks and accounting for the most recent contributions elaborated within them. The description integrates diachronic and synchronic observations and is complemented by an overview of the overlapping areas between the reflexive and the middle domain. 1. Theoretical Assumptions An adequate description of the reflexive system in Ancient Greek en…
Date: 2013-11-01

Direct Object

(2,079 words)

Author(s): Egle Mocciaro
Abstract The direct objects express the semantic role of the patient, that is, the participant affected by a transitive situation. In Ancient Greek, the case of the direct object is prototypically the accusative. However, on the basis of a scalar hypothesis of transitivity, the notion of affectedness may be conceived of as a gradual property of the objects. In this perspective, different ways of encoding the transitive objects may be individuated, namely the dative and the genitive. These should be interpreted as less typical instances of the category. 1. Theoretical Assumptions The l…
Date: 2013-11-01