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Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne)" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne)" )' returned 36 results. Modify search

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Colossus Neronis

(260 words)

Author(s): Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne)
[German version] (Colossus Solis). C. 40 m high, bronze portrait statue of Nero in Rome (Plin. HN 34,45; Suet. Nero 31; Mart. epigr. 2), conceived as a counterpart to his 120 foot high portrait on canvas in the horti Maiani (Plin. HN 35,51), near the vestibulum of the   domus aurea . The commissioned artist was  Zenodorus; Pliny visited his workshop and saw a clay model of the Colossus Neronis (HN 34,46). After the   damnatio memoriae of Nero, the colossus was transformed into a statue of Sol (Plin. HN 34,45; Suet. Vesp. 18); according to another tr…

Basilica Iulia

(213 words)

Author(s): Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne)
[German version] The Basilica lulia (BI) in Rome takes up the area between the Temple of Saturn and the Temple of the Dioscuri, bordered to the west by the vicus Iugarius and to the east by the vicus Tuscus. It was built on top of the  Basilica Sempronia as well as the house underneath, which was owned supposedly by Scipio Africanus. Remnants of both houses were found. The new BI also displaced the tabernae veteres and it is likely that the bordering streets had to be moved as well. Construction began in the year 54 BC ( Basilica Aemilia) and was completed by Augustus…

Basilica Fulvia

(255 words)

Author(s): Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne)
[German version] Built in Rome in 179 BC on instruction from the censors M. Aemilius Lepidus and M. Fulvius Nobilior (Liv. 40, 51, 2f.). It is possible that a previous building from 210 BC was incorporated (Plaut. Capt. 815; Plaut. Curc. 472). In 78 BC, the consul in office, M. Aemilius Lepidus, intervened in the construction (Plin. HN 35, 13);  Basilica Aemilia. H. Bauer developed an outline of the basic shape based on sparse structural remnants. Judging from the north-east corner of its foundation, the portico was located in front of the tabernae and ran 3 m behind the portico from …

Domus Laterani

(188 words)

Author(s): Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne)
[German version] In the written sources an aedes Lateranorum by Plautius Lateranus, the designated consul of the year 65, is attested in Rome during the Neronian period (Juv. 10,15,18; more regarding location near the Lateran basilica later: Jer. Ep. 77,4). An aedes Laterani (Ps.-Aur. Vict. Epit. 20,6) was created when Septimius Severus donated the aedes Parthorum to his senior commander T. Sextius Lateranus (PIR1 S 469). Three water pipelines (CIL XV 7536) bearing the names of Sextius Lateranus and his brother Sextius Torquatus (PIR1 S 478) were found in 1595 near the Lateran…

Atrium Vestae

(368 words)

Author(s): Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne)
[German version] The term relates to a precinct of the city of Rome between the Sacra Via and the Nova Via, south and east of the Temple of Vesta, and not solely to the residence of the Vestal virgins (Plin. Ep. 7,19,2; Gell. NA 1,12,9; Serv. Aen. 7,153f.). Early structural remains, probably of small huts from the 7th and 6th cents. BC, are possibly associated with a votive deposit to the Vestals from the 2nd half of the 6th cent. At the end of the 3rd cent. BC a wall was built to separate the Atr…

Atrium Libertatis

(136 words)

Author(s): Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne)
[German version] Building to the north-east of the Forum Iulium, used under the Republic as the office of the  censors, whose documents were kept there along with the texts of various statutes (Liv. 43,16,13; 45,15,5); in exceptional circumstances it was also the meeting place of the Senate. In 193 BC a porticus was erected from the nearby Porta Fontinalis to the altar of Mars on the  Campus Martius, where the census was held (Liv. 35,10,12). Extended in 194 BC (Liv. 34,44,5), the Atrium Libertati…

Aqua Marcia

(334 words)

Author(s): Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne)
[German version] Erected in 144-140 BC by praetor urbanus Q. Marcius Rex who had been commissioned by the Senate to repair the Aqua Appia and Anio Vetus (Plin. HN 36, 121; Frontin. Aq. 7). It brought the coolest and purest water of all Roman city aqueducts right to the Capitol (Plin. HN 31, 41;  Roma;  Water supply). Repairs were carried out in 33 BC by Agrippa, in 11-4 BC by Augustus (Frontin. Aq. 9; 125), AD 79 Titus (CIL 6, 1246), by Hadrian, in 196 by Septimius Severus (CIL 6, 1247) and 212/13 Carac…

Diaeta

(341 words)

Author(s): Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne)
[German version] Room in a Roman  villa; however, it is not possible within the framework of Roman villa architecture to define a diaeta typologically or historically either on the basis of the villa letters of Pliny the Younger (Plin. Ep. 2,17; 5,6) or on other traditions. In both Laurentinum and Tusci, Pliny provides descriptions of seven diaeta each (Plin. Ep. 2,17,2; 2,17,13; 2,17,20; 5,6,20; 5,6,27). Their symmetry in numbers as well as in their aesthetic evaluation is a deliberate literary design, linking both letters compositionally, without i…

Basilica Paulli

(365 words)

Author(s): Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne)
[German version] Considered ‘one of the most beautiful buildings in the world’ (Plin. HN 36,102), it took the place of the  Basilica Fulvia on the north-east corner of the  Forum Romanum in Rome (Stat. Silv. 1,1,30) but showed certain differences to the latter in its ground plan. It was restored by members of the gens Aemilia (78, 54, 34 and 14 BC, as well as under Tiberius in AD 22.; cf.  Basilica Aemilia), also after the fires of AD 283 and again in the early 5th cent. Initial excavations were performed in 1898-1914. In 1922-1940, the series of tabernae in front and the wall separating the…

Ager Vaticanus

(102 words)

Author(s): Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne)
[German version] Territory on the right bank of the Tiber (Plin. HN 3, 54; Liv. 10, 26,15) below the confluence of the Cremera. The area was used for farming and, just as the quality of its wines (Mart. 1, 18, 2; 6, 92, 3; 10, 45, 5; 12, 48, 14), was regarded as poor (Cic. Leg. agr. 2, 96). In the areas close to Rome, horti ( Gardens) were established in the 1st cent. BC, which later became imperial possessions. The more distant areas remained farmland up to late antiquity (Symmachus, Ep. 6, 58, 1). Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne) Bibliography Richardson, 405.

Basilica Porcia

(95 words)

Author(s): Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne)
[German version] Erected in 184 BC near the Curia Hostilia by Cato Censorius, financed from public funds (Plut. Cato mai. 19, 3; Plut. Cato min. 5, 1), Rome's oldest basilica. When Clodius was killed in 52 BC and his followers turned the Curia into his funeral pyre, the Basilica Porcia burned down as well. Two substructural rooms in opus incertum possibly stem from the Sullan building phase; they are located directly on the Clivus Lautumiarum (Clivus Argentarius) across from the carcer. Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne) Bibliography E. M. Steinby, in: LTUR 1, 187 Richardson, 56.

Carinae

(226 words)

Author(s): Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne)
[German version] Two Roman municipal districts, separated by the murus terreus Carinarum, a part of the pre-Servian wall which still existed in Varro's times (Varro Ling. 5,48), between Esquiline and Palatine. As part of the Augustan reorganization, both districts were jointly assigned to regio IV (Templum Pacis); the origin of the name is disputed (Serv. Aen. 8,351; Hor. Epist. 1,7,48). The district was the most desirable residential area for the Roman nobility; it was said that, even in Archaic times,  T…

Capitolium

(1,021 words)

Author(s): Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne) | Eder, Walter (Berlin)
[German version] I. Capitol Hill in Rome, consisting of a summit called C. in the south (46 m) and the Arx in the north (49 m), linked by the depression of the asylum. Until Trajan's forum was built, the C. was the south-western spur of the Quirinal and linked with it by a bridge. From archaic times, buildings on the C. had to have very deep foundations because of unfavourable geological conditions; in addition, since ancient times, there have been landslides, terracing (in the 15th and 16th cents.), as well as other substa…

Caelius Mons

(377 words)

Author(s): Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne) | Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] [1] Hill in Rome Hill in Rome, c. 2 km long, 400-500 m high. Although Caelius Mons (CM) is counted amongst the oldest of the city's hills (Dion. Hal. 2,50,1; Tac. Ann. 4,56; 11,24), its largest part was outside the   pomerium . Even though graves were still sited there in the Republican age, the area later developed into a fashionable residential district (Cic. Off. 3,16,66; Plin. HN 36,48; Tac. Ann. 4,64); in the Imperial Age, when the slopes of the Esquilin and the Colosseum were built up with insulae, the fashionable district moved to the upper part of the hill. …

Sparta

(5,406 words)

Author(s): Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum) | Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld) | Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne)
This item can be found on the following maps: Sparta | Theatre | Christianity | Doric Migration | Dark Ages | Hellenistic states | Achaeans, Achaea | Colonization | Apollo | Macedonia, Macedones | Natural catastrophes | Persian Wars | Punic Wars | Athletes | Athenian League (Second) | Education / Culture (Σπάρτη/ Spártē, Doric Σπάρτα/ Spárta). I. Political history [German version] A. Archaic period City in Laconica on the middle reaches of the Eurotas; originally four villages (Cynosura [3], Limnae, Pitana/Pitane, Mesoa), which developed from settlements of D…

Castra

(2,134 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon) | Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne) | Šašel Kos, Marjeta (Ljubljana) | Lombardo, Mario (Lecce) | Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) | Et al.
A. Military camp [German version] [I 1] General The Roman soldiers always made sure that they were protected by fortifications. This also applied when they only stopped for a night on campaigns. In the evening of their arrival the field camp had to be set up and destroyed again on the morning of departure. The plural castra was the name given to any kind of military camp, the singular castrum certainly existed but was not used in mil. vocabulary. Castellum is the diminutive form of castra (Veg. Mil. 3,8) and also had a civilian meaning. The origin of the Roman camps is uncertain; because …
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