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Encyclopaedia

(2,215 words)

Author(s): Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari) | Sallmann, Klaus (Mainz)
[German version] I. General An encyclopaedia is a work containing the ‘totality of knowledge’ for a whole field or for individual disciplines. The word is derived from Greek   enkýklios paideía (ἐγκύκλιος παιδεία), whose Latin translation orbis doctrinarum is closer to the modern understanding of encyclopaedia. The term is first documented in a letter of AD 1490 to Poliziano [12; 13]. Encyclopaedia and ‘Encyclopaedism’ (cf. French encyclopédisme, Italian enciclopedismo) are modern words and concepts that may be used within certain limits for antiquity (on their …

Palaephatus

(655 words)

Author(s): Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari)
[German version] (Παλαίφατος/ Palaíphatos, 'the one who tells old stories'). Passed down to us under this pseudonym was the collection Περὶ ἀπίστων/ Perì apístōn ( On Incredible Things) containing 52 short chapters about the same number of myths. The Suda records under P. four people with this name. The first is an epic poet from Athens, author of a cosmogony; the second comes, according to Suda, from Paros or Priene (Πριηνεύς/ Priēneús probably incorrect instead of Παριανεύς/ Parianeús, i.e. 'from Parion': the encyclopaedia therefore fluctuates perhaps between the island…

Priscus

(884 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari) | Franke, Thomas (Bochum) | Brisson, Luc (Paris) | Johne, Klaus-Peter (Berlin)
Common Roman cognomen ('venerable') . Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) [German version] [1] Greek grammarian (Πρεῖσκος/ Preîskos). The 3rd cent. AD PTurner 39 (PIenensis inv. 267), a book catalogue from a private library, presents at line 4 'a commentary on epic verses by P.' [2], who is identified as one of the two Prisci mentioned in Ov. Pont. 4,16,10 ( Priscus uter); he may be identical to Clutorius Priscus, the Roman equestrian and poet mentioned in Tac. Ann. 3,49 and Cass. Dio 57,20,3-4. Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari) Bibliography 1 SH 710 A 2 R. Otranto, Antiche liste di libri su papi…

Philostephanus

(477 words)

Author(s): Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari) | Bäbler, Balbina (Göttingen)
(Φιλοστέφανος/ Philostéphanos). [German version] [1] P. of Cyrene Pupil of Callimachus, 3rd cent. BC Pupil (γνώριμος/ gnṓrimos) of Callimachus [3] (Ath. 331d; cf. [4. vol. 2, 752]), lived in the reign of Ptolemaeus Philopator (222-206 BC, cf. [1. 30]). Author of ostensibly geographical works whose true compass is in the aetiological and paradoxographic (Gell. NA 9,4,3 puts P. alongside other authors of res inauditae, Aristeas, Ctesias, Onesicritus), of which we have only scanty fragments and titles, which may also denote parts of a single comprehensive wor…

Menalkas

(80 words)

Author(s): Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari)
[English version] (Μενάλκας). Bukolischer Dichter, zusammen mit Daphnis Protagonist von Theokr. 8. Von seiner nicht erwiderten Liebe zu Daphnis sprechen schon Hermesianax (fr. 2 und 3 Powell) und Sositheos (fr. 1a-3 Snell). Der Name kehrt in Vergilius' Bucolica häufig wieder, gewiß als alter ego des Dichters und auch als Figur, die auf eine tragische Liebesgeschichte verweist. Die Person des M. ist wohl nicht historisch. Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari) Bibliography F. Michelazzo, s.v. Menalca, Enciclopedia Virgiliana, 3, 1987, 477-480 (mit Lit.).

Oppianos

(770 words)

Author(s): Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari)
(Ὀππιανός). [English version] [1] aus Korykos, Verf. eines Lehrgedichts über Fischfang O. aus Korykos in Kilikien, von O. [2] zu unterscheidender Verf. eines Lehrgedichts Ἁλιευτικά ( Halieutiká, ‘Über den Fischfang, 3506 V. in 5 B.), das Marcus [1] Aurelius und Commodus gewidmet ist (177-180 n.Chr.). Quellen für die Biographie: Den Hss. vorgeschaltete Viten, nach denen O. von Septimius Severus verbannt und von Caracalla wieder in Rom aufgenommen wurde (Suda s.v. Ὀ.; Athen. 1,13c). Inhalt: B. 1 und 2 beschreiben Arten, vo…

Euteknios

(227 words)

Author(s): Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari)
[English version] (Εὐτέκνιος). In dem berühmten Cod. Vindobonensis med. gr. 1 (spätes 5. Jh. n.Chr.), der Pedanius Dioskurides enthält, finden sich auch Prosaparaphrasen zu den Thēriaká und den Alexiphármaka des Nikandros [4; 2; 5]. Der Kolophon weist sie einem ‘Rhetor’ (σοφιστής) E. zu, der in die Zeit zw. dem 3. und 5. Jh. n.Chr. zu datieren ist [3. 34-37]; demselben E. werden deswegen ohne stichhaltigen Beweis auch die in derselben Hs. folgenden anon. Paraphrasen zu den Halieutiká (ab 3,605) des Oppianos [4; 6] und - schon seit C. Gesner 1555 - zu den Ixeutiká des Dionysios [29] […

Herennios Philon

(691 words)

Author(s): Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari)
[English version] A. Person H. war Antiquar und Grammatiker der 2. H. des 1. Jh. n.Chr. (Hauptquelle für die Biographie: Suda s.v. Φίλων Βύβλιος, φ 447, wo der Text jedoch problematisch ist). Sein ursprünglicher Name war Phílōn, das Ethnikon Býblios (nach der Stadt Byblos/Phönizien), das Praenomen H. vielleicht von Herennius Severus Plin. epist. 4,28 übernommen [4]. Er war Lehrer des Hermippos von Berytos. Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari) [English version] B. Werke (FGrH 790): Histor.-antiquarische Werke: 1) Die ‘phöniz. Gesch. (Φοινικικὴ ἱστορία oder Φοινικικά), nach …

Marcellus

(1,746 words)

Author(s): Weißenberger, Michael (Greifswald) | Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari) | Schmidt, Peter L. (Constance) | Rist, Josef (Würzburg) | Markschies, Christoph (Berlin) | Et al.
[German version] I. Greek (Μαρκέλλος; Markéllos). [German version] [I 1] From Pergamum, orator, 2nd cent. AD, [1] Rhetor from Pergamum known solely from a brief reference in the Suda; he is said to have written a book (or several books) entitled Ἀδριανὸς ἢ περὶ βασιλείας/ Adrianòs ḕ perì basileías (‘Hadrian, or On Monarchy’). He would thus have lived in the first half of the 2nd cent.; whether Dio's [I 3] speeches perì basileías, addressed to Trajan, served as a model is uncertain. Weißenberger, Michael (Greifswald) [German version] [I 2] From Side, physician and poet, 2nd cent. AD M. from …

Heliodorus

(2,533 words)

Author(s): Mehl, Andreas (Halle/Saale) | Donohue, Alice A. (Bryn Mawr) | Neudecker, Richard (Rome) | Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg) | Touwaide, Alain (Madrid) | Et al.
(Ἡλιόδωρος; Heliódōros). [German version] [1] Chancellor under Seleucus IV, 2nd cent. BC Son of Aeschylus of Antioch on the Orontes, was educated with Seleucus IV and was a courtier (τῶν περὶ τὴν αὐλήν) and well-respected chancellor (ὁ ἐπὶ τῶν πραγμάτων τεταγμένος) under him in 187-175 BC (IG XI 4,1112-1114, or OGIS 247; App. Syr. 45). When financial difficulties after the defeat of Seleucus' father Antiochus III against the Romans (190/188), in conjunction with internal Jewish intrigues, had led to special…

Menecrates

(1,116 words)

Author(s): Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen) | Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg) | Nutton, Vivian (London) | Meister, Klaus (Berlin) | Mehl, Andreas (Halle/Saale) | Et al.
(Μενεκράτης; Menekrátes). [German version] [1] Attic comic poet, 5th cent. BC Attic comic poet of the 5th cent. BC. Two titles of his plays have survived, Ἑρμιονεύς/ Hermioneús (or Ἑρμιόνη/ Hermiónē?) and Μανέκτωρ/ Manéktōr (probably ‘Manes as Hector) [1. test. 1], as well as an anapaestic tetrameter (fr. 1) from the latter. It is uncertain whether Menecrates was once victorious at the Dionysia [1. test. *2]. Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen) Bibliography 1 PCG VII, 1989, 1-2. [German version] [2] Tragic poet, 5th cent. BC Greek tragic poet, victor at the Great Dionysia in…

Stasinus

(106 words)

Author(s): Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari)
[German version] (Στασῖνος; Stasînos). Epic poet of unknown date, from Cyprus. According to a widespread tradition lasting until Proclus and Tzetzes, he wrote the Cypria supposedly named after his homeland. According to an anecdote which Pindar may already have known (Pind. fr. 265 Snell-Maehler; but cf. [3.33]), Homer (Homerus [1]) gave the epic to his daughter as a dowry for her marriage to S. (the legend shows that there were problems as to its authorship already in Antiquity). Epic cycle Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari) Bibliography 1 PEG I, 36-64 2 EpGF 28-29 3 M. Davies, The Epic Cyc…

Glaucus

(2,298 words)

Author(s): Scherf, Johannes (Tübingen) | Neudecker, Richard (Rome) | Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari) | Albiani, Maria Grazia (Bologna)
(Γλαῦκος; Glaûkos). The name means ‘glossy blue’, also ‘luminous’ [1];  Glauce: Hom. Il 16,34). [German version] [1] Sea demon A sea demon, into which a Boeotian fisherman from Anthedon was transformed after consuming a magical herb. The place of his jump into the sea after the transformation, Γλαύκου πήδημα ( Glaúkou pḗdēma, ‘Glaucus' jump’), was indicated (Paus. 9,22,6-7). Representations are known by Evanthes, Hedyle and Nicander (Ath. 7,295b-297c), by Callimachus (Suda s.v.), Q. Cornificius (Macrob. Sat. 6,5,13) and Cicero (Plut. Cic. 2,3,86…

Persinus

(100 words)

Author(s): Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari)
[German version] (Περσῖνος; Persînos). Epic writer of the Hellenistic period, from Ephesus or Miletus. Author of the Orphic Sōtḗria ('Songs for the Rescue'; Orph. T 178, p. 52 Kern). Two sayings have been passed down to us, one about the tyrant Eubulus, the other as a response to the question who is the best poet ( according to the judgment of all poets, he himself is the best poet, according to the others, it is Homer). P. attributed the invention of the hexameter to Linus. Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari) Bibliography SH 666A-666D  U. von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff, Hellenische Dichtung, vol. 1…

Musaeus

(1,336 words)

Author(s): Heinze, Theodor (Geneva) | Hidber, Thomas (Berne) | Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari)
(Μουσαῖος; Mousaîos). [German version] [1] Mythical companion of the Muses Mythical companion of the Muses (whose name is an adjectival derivative of Μοῦσα ( Moûsa; ‘Muse’)), an archegete of poetry and a close associate of Orpheus connected with Eleusis [1] . As a scion of the Muses (and Selene: Pl. Resp. 2,364e), M. was brought up by them (Ps.-Eur. Rhes. 945-947) and buried on their hill in Athens (Paus. 1,25,8; in Phaleron: Anth. Pal. 7,615). The origin of M. who lived in Eleusis and Athens (Suda s.v. Μ.) (pelike, Beazley, ARV2 1313,7, end of the 5th cent. BC; Aristoxenos fr. 91 Wehrli2 = 2 A…

Panegyrics

(2,072 words)

Author(s): Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari) | Dingel, Joachim (Hamburg) | Berger, Albrecht (Berlin)
[German version] I. Greek The modern term 'panegyric' derives from πανηγυρικός ( panēgyrikós sc. λόγος/ lógos), a Greek term denoting a speech delivered during a πανήγυρις ( panḗgyris), a real or fictive 'festival', e.g. the Olympic Games. In the fictive sense →Isocrates was the first to call his fourth speech (389 BC) a Panēgyrikós (Isoc. Or. 59 and 84, 12,172; Letter 3,6; cf. Aristot. Rh. 1408b 15-17). In the broadest sense of the word, the forms of the epideictic genre ('display speech', epídeixis; → genera causarum) belong to panegyric oratory; in the rhetorical treatises of…

Hephaestion

(1,281 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) | Neudecker, Richard (Rome) | Ameling, Walter (Jena) | Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari) | Hübner, Wolfgang (Münster)
(Ἡφαιστίων; Hēphaistíōn). [German version] [1] Commander under Alexander the Great, 4th cent. BC H. of Pella, friend and probably lover of  Alexander [4]. Their relationship was soon likened to that of  Patroclus and  Achilles [1] and correspondingly embellished. It is doubtful whether he was a childhood friend of Alexander (Curt. 3,12,16), as he was not banished by  Philippus II in 337 BC. The wreath offered to Patroclus at Troy and the scene described in the vulgate version ( Alexander historians) of the c…

Niceratus

(427 words)

Author(s): Kinzl, Konrad (Peterborough) | Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari) | Neudecker, Richard (Rome)
(Νικήρατος; Nikḗratos). [German version] [1] Athenian trierarch, 410/409 BC Son of Nicias [1]; learned reciter of Homer (Xen. Symp. 3,5; 4,6; Aristot. Rhet. 1413a). Athenian trierarch (Trierarchy) in 410/409 BC (IG I3 375,36). Of the wealth his grandfather had acquired from silver mines and mine slaves, at the time of his murder by the Thirty ( Triákonta ) in 404/3 BC only 14 talents were left (Lys. 19,47; Xen. Hell. 2,3,39; Diod. 14,5,5). After his murder his uncle Diognetus [1] interceded against the Thirty with the Spartan king Pausanias by placing N.'s son on his knee (Lys. 18,6-10). Kin…

Eulogius

(178 words)

Author(s): Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari)
[German version] (Εὐλόγιος; Eulógios). Perhaps the person to whom was dedicated the lexicon of Hesychius (6th cent. AD [4; 1. 358]; but [5] dates E. to the period between Theodosius of Alexandria ([4th cent. AD] and Choeroboscus [9th cent. AD]) and who is known through the citations in the Etymologicum Magnum and in the Etymologicum Gudianum. He is also the source of some Homeric epimerisms [2; 3]. E. was a grammarian and his nickname was Scholastikós; he was the author of a didactic book about morphology in ‘Questions and Answers’ (Ἀπορίαι καὶ λύσεις, ‘Difficulties …

Hermon

(497 words)

Author(s): Podella, Thomas (Lübeck) | Schmitz, Winfried (Bielefeld) | Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari)
[German version] [1] Mountain massif Mountain massif (maximum height 2,814 m) south of the Antilebanon; Hebrew Ḥærmôn (from ḥrm ‘ban, taboo’), Greek Ἀερμών; Aermṓn, Latin Hermon, modern Ǧabal aš-Šaiḫ, ‘mountain of the white-haired man’ / Ǧabal aṯ-Ṯalǧ, ‘snow mountain’. Dt 3:9 equates H. with Phoenician Śiriōn and Amorite Śenīr, hence H. would be found as Šryn in Ugaritic, Šarijana in Hittite and Saniru in Assyrian. Biblical tradition considers H. to be the northern border of the land conquered by Moses and Joshua east of the Jordan (Jos 11:17; Dt 3:8). From the biblical references it is not clear whether H. describes the whole Antilebanon ( Antilibanus) or only its northern and southern foothills. Josephus (Ant. Iud. 5,3,1) does not speak of H. but only of ‘Mount Lebanon’ ( Libanus); Eusebius (On. 20,12) describes only the southern foothills as H. On the south-western summit are the remains o…
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