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Nunation

(1,107 words)

Author(s): Franz-Christoph Muth
In Classical Arabic, the grammatical term ‘nunation’ (from Arabic tanwīn ) is defined as the usually unvocalized suffix - n, which is pronounced but not written at the end of nouns. At first, nunation was graphically represented by double-colored dots (Endress 1982:179; Lipiński 1997:163), and later by doubling the appropriate vowel signs. The masculine accusative ending - an, which sounded in pause - ā was written with an ʾalif as lengthening marker in combination with the double vowel marker. As a marker of indefiniteness ( tankīr), nunation is applied to triptotic nouns witho…
Date: 2018-04-01

Proper Names

(4,923 words)

Author(s): Franz-Christoph Muth
Arabic proper or personal names ( ism, pl. ʾasmāʾ, ʿalam; or ism ʿalam, pl. ʾasmāʾ ʾaʿlām) (Wright 1896:I, 107B), known from many sources and particularly abundant, are given for purposes of identification and for social and political interaction (Wild 1982:154). According to the rules of Arabic nomenclature, the full Arabic personal name is usually composed of the following elements: (i) the proper or personal name ( ism or ʿalam); (ii) the lineage ( nasab); (iii) the paternal or maternal name or agnomen ( kunya); (iv) the relative name (nisba); and (v) the nickname ( laqab) or a pejora…
Date: 2018-04-01