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Deverbative Verbs

(712 words)

Author(s): Helena Maquieira
Abstract Deverbative verbs are verbs derived from a verbal lexical base by means of derivational morphemes (usually suffixes). Deverbative verbs constitute, as do denominative verbs, a type of secondary derivation by means of suffixes to create verbs from other verbs. In contrast to this type of derivation, primary derivation creates verbs from a pure base – neither nominal nor verbal – (Denominal Verbs). The creation of deverbative verbs served two basic purposes in the language. On the one hand, the Indo-European speech community used this morphological procedure …
Date: 2013-11-01

Denominal Verbs

(904 words)

Author(s): Helena Maquieira
Abstract Denominal verbs are those derived from a nominal lexical base by means of derivational morphemes (usually suffixes). Denominal verbs are derived from nominal lexical bases (adjectives or nouns, although upon rare occasions from other word-classes as well) by means of derivational morphemes (usually suffixes). Denominal verbs are generally formed by means of the addition of the suffix * -jo/e- to a nominal base of any declension. By means of this suffix the PIE stems of the present tense were derived. Later on, a complete conjugation developed, …
Date: 2013-11-01

Lexical Change

(2,758 words)

Author(s): Helena Maquieira
Abstract Lexical change is a type of language change that may consist in a change in the form of a lexeme or in the concept conveyed by a given lexeme, or even in the creation of a new word for a given referent. Lexical change is concerned specifically with the lexeme(s) of a word rather than with its eventual morphemes. Lexical change refers to the evolution of the lexicon: the appearance, disappearance and recovery of lexemes within words. Lexical change is a type of language change that may consist in a change in the form of a lexeme or in the concept conveyed by a gi…
Date: 2013-11-01

Morphological Change

(3,432 words)

Author(s): Helena Maquieira
Abstract Morphological change is a type of language change that may affect the phonetic representation of, the meaning conveyed by or the usage rules of a given morpheme. Morphological change may be triggered by phonetic developments, psychological or sociolinguistic factors, etc. In fact, psychological factors like analogy are often considered to be the most important motivation for change at the morphological level. Morphological change is a type of variation in the grammatical component of the language that may affect the phonetic representation of th…
Date: 2013-11-01