Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Hoffmann, Lars" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Hoffmann, Lars" )' returned 53 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Melissourgos, Macarios

(450 words)

Author(s): Hoffmann, Lars Martin
[Melissenus] d. 1585. Greece. Archbishop of Monembasia and author of a counterfeited Chronicon maius in vernacular Greek prose, which was long ascribed to the 15th-century chronicler Georgios Sphrantzes.The view that Sphrantzes composed this chronicle originates with Melisourogos himself, and is rooted in the manuscripts, which give the work the title Χρονικὸν τοῦ Γεωργίου Φραντῆ τοῦ χρηματίσαντος πρωτοβεστιαρίτου καὶ μετέπειτα Μεγάλου Λογοθέτου, διὰ δὲ τοῦ θείου καὶ ἀγγελικοῦ σχήματος μετονομασθέντος Γρηγορίου μοναχοῦ (C…
Date: 2021-03-15

Bryennios, Nikephoros

(337 words)

Author(s): Hoffmann, Lars Martin
1062-1137. Byzanitum. Nikephoros Bryennios was born close to Adrianople (Edirne, modern Turkey) and lived and died at Constantinople. He was a member of a noble and powerful family of the Byzantine capital whose personal merits in military affairs allowed him to approach rapidly the inner circle of the emperor Alexios I Komnenos, who married him to his daughter Anna Komnene. After Alexios' death in 1081, Anna incited her husband to play an active role in an insurrection against her brother John, who was the legitimate successor of her father, but Nikeph…
Date: 2021-03-15

Ioannes Laurentius Lydus

(361 words)

Author(s): Hoffmann, Lars Martin
[John of Lydia] 6th century. Byzantium. Administrator and author of works on divination and on history. Ioannes was born ca 490 at Philadelphia in Lydia (today Alasehir in Turkey). Apparently he came to Constantinople around 510, and there he began his official career as a high functionary of the Early Byzantine State during the reign of Emperors Anastasius (490-518) and Justinian I (527-65). He retired in 552 and, like many Roman nobleman, he became a writer and took particular pride in teaching Latin. We do not know when he died.Two of his works deal with history. The first, on th…
Date: 2021-03-15

Akropolites, Konstantinos

(228 words)

Author(s): Hoffmann, Lars Martin
13th-14th century. Byzantium. The son of the historian Georgius Akropolites. Little is known of his biography. He followed his father, who was tutor to the Emperor Theodoros II Doukas Laskaris (1254-58), in a series of high positions in the civil administration of the Byzantine Empire. From 1282 to 1294 he was finance minister ( logothetes tou genikou) and from 1305 to 1321 "prime minister" ( megas logothetes). Apparently he must have been died after 1324/25.Besides his rhetorical and hagiographical writings Konstantinos began to compile a Roman and Byzantine history …
Date: 2021-03-15

Ioannes VI Kantakouzenos

(573 words)

Author(s): Hoffmann, Lars Martin
[Byzantine Emperor John VI] ca 1292-1383 (reigned 1347-54). Byzantium. The reign of Ioannes VI marks the beginning of the gradual mortal agony which started in the Byzantine Empire about 1350 and would last about 100 years. The first half of the 14th century had been characterised by long civil wars, and the hatred between noble families and different social groups. Ioannes Kantakouzenos was born in Constantinople and his family was closely related to the ruling dynasty of the Palaeologues. During the war between the Emperors Andronicus II (1272-1328) and Andronicus III (1322/28-134…
Date: 2021-03-15

John of Nikiu

(582 words)

Author(s): Hoffmann, Lars Martin | Wood, Philip
mid-7th century. Egypt. John was a Coptic bishop of Nikiû, a former city in the south-western part of the Nile delta, and author of a chronicle that extends from Creation to the 640s. In 689 he took part in the election of the Coptic pope Isaac (689-92) at Alexandria, and in the same year he was sent in an official mission of his church to the Arab governor at Cairo. Under pope Simeon I (692-700) he was general supervisor of Coptic monasteries. But after indirectly causing the death of a monk in the 690s, John was deposed from his bishopric and from his office as supervisor. He may have died around 700.J…
Date: 2021-03-15

Scriptor incertus de Leone Armenio

(332 words)

Author(s): Hoffmann, Lars Martin
9th century. Byzantium. The text with the title Συγγραφὴ χρονογραφίου τὰ κατὰ Λέοντα υἱὸν Βάρδα τοῦ Ἀρμενίου περιέχουσα (Compiled chronicle containing what happened to Leo, the son of Bardas the Armenian) is a record on the reigns of the Byzantine Emperors Michael I (811-13) and Leo V (813-20). Leo himself was a son of the Byzantine patricius Bardas, whose family originated from Armenia. Modern scholars are not sure if the text was composed as an independent chronicle or if it was intended to continue Ioannes Malalas or Theophanes Confessor. The author fiercely criticises Leo V for…
Date: 2021-03-15

Candidus of Isauria

(279 words)

Author(s): Hoffmann, Lars Martin
second half of the 5th century. Byzantium. On record as a notary or clerk in the service of certain noble families of his native Isauria, Candidus was the author of a History (Λόγοι ἱστορίας, Logoi historias), which according to the information supplied by the patriarch Photios I (9th century), originally consisted of three volumes ( l ogoi). From the whole text only a short summary in the so-called Bibliotheke of Photios has come down to us. Photios reports some autobiographical comments from Candidus's work, recording that he was born at Tracheia in Cilicia (A…
Date: 2021-03-15

Ephraem of Ainus

(490 words)

Author(s): Hoffmann, Lars Martin
early 14th century. Byzantium. Author of a verse chronicle of Roman and Byzantine Emperors, written in iambic trimeters and in highest level of Greek language. Unfortunately we have little exact information about Ephraem, though he was probably born at Ainus (now Ezes in European Turkey). This assumption is based on the old library catalogue of the Vatican, which has listed the work since the 16th century as Ἐφραὶμ Αἰνίου χρονικὴ ἱστορία (Chronicle of Ephraem from Ainos); presumably this must have been taken from earlier catalogues or from the manuscript it…
Date: 2021-03-15

Agathias of Myrina

(454 words)

Author(s): Hoffmann, Lars Martin
[Agathias Scholastikos] 6th century. Byzantium (Asia Minor). Author of a History (Ἱστορία) of Byzantine affairs 552-59. Agathias, whose biography we know quite well from the preface of his History and from his poetry in the famous Palatine Anthology, was from Myrina (now Sandarlik) in Mysia, Asia Minor (approx. 40 km from Pergamon). There he was born about the year 532. Like many of his contemporaries he completed a rhetorical education which allowed him to take over a higher function in the administration of Smyrna (İzmir). Later on he moved to Constantinople where he worked as lawy…
Date: 2021-03-15

Attaliates, Michael

(518 words)

Author(s): Hoffmann, Lars Martin
ca 1028 - after 1085. Byzantium. Michael Attaleiates is one of those figures in the Byzantine society of the 11th century who were beneficiaries of the dynastic change from the Macedonian Emperors to the family Commenus, he was able to gain not only high official rank, but also extensive lands for his own use. Attaleitates was born in Constantinople. As his family name reveals, his forefathers migrated to the Byzantine capital from Attaleia (now Antalya, Asia Minor). After his training in rhetoric and law he made his fortune rapidly. About 1059 we can find him in the …
Date: 2021-03-15

Chronographicon syntomon

(270 words)

Author(s): Hoffmann, Lars Martin
[Χρονογραφικὸν σύντομον (Concise chronicle)] end of the 10th century or later. Byzantium. A short universal chronicle from the Creation to the death of the EmperorKonstantinos VII Porphyrogennitos in 959. Late 19th-century scholarship judged it to be a falsification by the 16th-century writer and librarian Andreas Darmarius, but this view has been refuted with good reason by the modern editor.The manuscript tradition ascribes the Chronographicon syntomon implausibly to the patriarch Cyril of Alexandria (375/80-444), but the long title of the work states that it w…
Date: 2021-03-15

Pachymeres, Georgios

(471 words)

Author(s): Hoffmann, Lars Martin
1242- post-1308. Byzantium. Georgios Pachymeres was born in Nicaea (today Iznik, Turkey), which after the Fourth Crusade had gradually replaced Constantinople as the most important local centre of the Byzantine Empire. He received a thorough rhetorical and literary education which found its expression in his observable preference for linguistic and verbal archaisms. One of his teachers may have been Georgios Akropolites. After the Byzantines recaptured Constantinople in 1261, Pachymeres soon became deacon and also lawyer ( dikaiophylax) at the Hagia Sophia.Besides numerous …
Date: 2021-03-15

Ekthesis chronike

(168 words)

Author(s): Hoffmann, Lars Martin
[Ἔκθεσις χρονική (Chronological consideration)] early or mid-16th century. Byzantium. An anonymous chronicle of the years 1392-1517. We do not know where it was composed, but it is written in a quite low level of style particularly close to the vernacular language. A later version was continued up to 1543.The chronicle records the last decades of Byzantium, as well as the Ottoman conquests in the Balkans and the social interaction of Christians and Ottomans after the fall of Constantinople (1453). Sources include Doukas and Georgios Sphrantzes. The text was later incorporated a…
Date: 2021-03-15

Akropolites, Georgios

(490 words)

Author(s): Hoffmann, Lars Martin
1217-82. Byzantium. Born at Constantinople, he was sent by his parents in 1233 to Nicaea to study rhetoric and philosophy. One of his teachers was Nikephoros Blemmydes who introduced him to the circle of Emperor Ioannes III Doukas Vatatzes (1222-54). About 1246 Akropolites was made teacher of the Emperor's son Theodoros and also began his career as Byzantine functionary which continued under the reign of Michael VIII Palaeologos. From ca 1240 as megas logariastes Georgios was responsible for the finances of the Nicaean army, and from 1255 to 1282 he held the office …
Date: 2021-03-15

Chronicon Bruxellense

(193 words)

Author(s): Hoffmann, Lars Martin
11th century. Byzantium. This anonymous Greek-language chronicle, apparently compiled after the year 1033 probably at Constantinople, has been known by the modern title Chronicon Bruxellense (from the location of the manuscript, in Brussels) since the 19th-century edition. It is in fact an annotated list of Roman and Byzantine emperors from Julius Caesar up to Romanos III Argyros (1028-33), with expansive historical notes assigned to the reign of every emperor, often containing unique information. For the classical Roman period one can find especia…
Date: 2021-03-15

Chronicle of Monemvasia

(256 words)

Author(s): Hoffmann, Lars Martin
[Τὸ περὶ τῆς κτίσεως τῆς Μονεμβασίας χρονικόν (Chronicle about the foundation of Monemvasia)] 9th century. Greece. A local chronicle in Greek prose dealing with the historical events on the Byzantine Peloponnese from the foundation of Monemvasia in 559 till the year 806. It provides scarce information about villages, wars and foreign peoples, although the city of Patras receives special attention. As a historical source the text is particularly valuable for the settlement of Avars and Slavs in Southern Greece and the gradual consolidation of the Byza…
Date: 2021-03-15

Byzantine historiography

(5,113 words)

Author(s): Hoffmann, Lars Martin
Introduction: Historiography and ChronographyIn Byzantine historical writing we find two main text types which are also known in the literature of other cultures: on the one hand the narrative history which deals with a particular sequence of historical events, and on the other, the traditional annalistic chronicle, be it universal or more limited in scope. Both models can, of course, be traced back to precursors of the classical period or late antiquity; as we might expect, the Byzantine tradition…
Date: 2021-03-15

Chronicle of the Morea

(869 words)

Author(s): Hoffmann, Lars Martin
[Χρονικὸν τοῦ Μορέως; Livre de la conqueste e de la prince de l'Amorée] 14th century. Crusader states. A chronicle the history of southern Greece under the period of French rule, existing in five versions, two in Greek verse and one each in French, Italian and Aragonese prose. The Chronicle of the Morea uniquely straddles Medieval Greek and French literature, composed as it was in the Greek world, but with content which rather belongs to the Romance cultural area. This is reflected in the complicated transmission of the text.Following the capture of Constantinople by crusader troops i…
Date: 2021-03-15

Chronicle of 811

(255 words)

Author(s): Hoffmann, Lars Martin
9th century. Byzantium. A Greek-language chronicle, originally part of a more comprehensive work which is now lost. The surviving chapter bears the title Περὶ Νικηφόρου τοῦ βασιλέως καὶ πῶς ἀφίησιν τὰ κῶλα ἐν Βουλγαρία (About the Emperor Nicephorus I and for what reason he left his bones in Bulgaria). The text records the unfortunate campaign of Emperor Nikephoros I (802-11) with a more critical eye than other Byzantine sources, and provides us with valuable information about the military tactics of the Bulgarians. After Nicephorus bought peace in the…
Date: 2021-03-15
▲   Back to top   ▲