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Pesiqta

(525 words)

Author(s): Jacobs, Martin
[English Version] I. Pesiqta Rabbati Der Name P., aram. »Abschnitt«, »Kapitel«, wird für zwei homiletische Midrashim, Pesiqta Rabbati (PesR) und Pesiqta deRav Kahana (PesK; s.u. II.) gebraucht. PesR ist eine Sammlung von Predigten zu den jüd. Feiertagen und ausgewählten Sabbaten, deren Textumfang letztlich durch die Drucke festgelegt wurde. Während der Erstdruck (1653 bzw. 1656) 47 Abschnitte aufweist, zählen spätere Editionen und die engl. Übers. bis zu 53 Kap. Einzelne Hsn. enthalten zusätzliche P…

Ethnarch

(175 words)

Author(s): Jacobs, Martin
[German Version] The Greek title ethnárchēs (ἐϑνάρχης) refers to a ruler of a tribe or a people with no indication of the scope of his authority. It is attested with this unspecific meaning in the Hellenistic-Roman eastern Mediterranean for both Jewish and non-Jewish representatives. The first Jewish ruler recognized as ethnarch by the Seleucids was the Maccabeean Simon (Maccabees), who also held the offices of general and high priest (1 Macc 14:47; 15:1ff.). Later, Hyrcanus I and II were called ethnarchs (Jos. Ant. XIV 148, 151, 191, etc.). Archelaus, the …

Ten Lost Tribes of Israel

(272 words)

Author(s): Jacobs, Martin
[German Version] Since the tribal territories of Judah (Judah/Judea) and Benjamin lay within the biblical Southern Kingdom, it is generally assumed that ¶ ten of the 12 tribes of Israel lived in the Northern Kingdom. We read in 2 Kgs 17:6 and 18:11 that Sargon II deported the population of the Northern Kingdom in 722 bce and settled its members in various places in Assyria. According to the version of Chronicles (Chronicles, Books of; 1 Chr 5:26), in 733 bce Tiglath Pileser III had already carried off some tribes to the same places, where they lived “to this day.” Since Ez…

Molko, Solomon

(141 words)

Author(s): Jacobs, Martin
[German Version] (born Dioguo Pirez; c. 1500, Lisbon? – 1532, Mantua). As a son of Conversos (Anusim), Molko was first a royal official in Lisbon. In connection with the messianic expectations (Messiah/Messianism: II, 2) aroused by D. Reuveni in 1525 among the Conversos in Portugal, he circumcised himself and declared his faith in Judaism. He produced kabbalistic writings (Kabbalah: II) and caused a sensation as a magician and as a visionary messianic personality. In Italy, he enjoyed the protecti…

Resh Galuta

(282 words)

Author(s): Jacobs, Martin
[German Version] The Aramaic title רֵישׁ גַלוּתָא, “head of the Diaspora” (Diaspora: II, 1; also called exilarch), and its Hebrew equivalent rosh ha-gola denoted the official representative of Babylonian Judaism. As in the case of the nasi, his rival, the office was dynastic and was associated with a claimed descent from David (III). In the Babylonian Diaspora, the resh galuta was considered the highest legal authority and the supreme authority for appointment to office. His competence was nevertheless challenged by competing claims, for example those o…

Sanhedrin

(271 words)

Author(s): Jacobs, Martin
[German Version] Sanhedrin, Hebrew (and Aram.) ןירִדהַנְסַ, loanword from Greek συνέδριον/ synédrion, “assembly, tribunal, ¶ council.” Earlier scholarship saw in the Sanhedrin the highest legislative and judicial body of Palestinian Judaism (I), established in the Hellenistic period and continued by the rabbis (II, 1) into the 5th century after the destruction of the second temple (II, 4); initially it was headed by the high priest, later by the nasi. This picture is a harmonization of statements in Flavius Jo…

Judah ha-Nasi

(304 words)

Author(s): Jacobs, Martin
[German Version] (Yehudah; Judah I, “Rabbi” [late 2nd/early 3rd cent. ce]), was a Palestinian patriarch (Nasi). Judah is said to be a descendant of Hillel ¶ ( y. Ketub. 12:3 [35a]) and claimed, furthermore, a genealogy tracing back to David. He was the most important representative of the dynasty of Jewish patriarchs and resided in Beth-Shearim and Sepphoris. Since he combined wealth, political prestige, and religious authority, he had decisive influence on the increasing institutionalization of the rabbinic movement and t…

Aaron

(576 words)

Author(s): Schaper, Joachim | Jacobs, Martin
[German Version] I. Old Testament - II. Early Judaism I. Old Testament The origin of the name is uncertain. In the Old Testament Aaron is the brother of Mose and his spokesman (Exod 4:14f.). He was reputed to be a “Levite” (priest; Exod 4:14), and the traveling companion and deputy of Moses (Exod 7:1–7), a miracle-worker (Exod 8:1f.), a charismatic leader (Exod 17:10–12…

Rabbi

(1,285 words)

Author(s): Jacobs, Martin | Wilke, Carsten | Schaller, Berndt
[German Version] I. Terminology The Hebrew title רַבִּי/ rabbî is derived from the nominalized adjective רַב/ rab, “great, of high rank,” which in postbiblical Hebrew took on the meaning “master” (Rav) in contrast to a slave or student/disciple ( m. Sukk. 2:9; m. Giṭ. 4:4; m. ʾAbot 1:3). The honorific rabbi (“my master/teacher”) became a title, associated with the names of Palestinian men of learning (e.g. Rabbi Akiba ben Joseph), while Rav was used for Babylonian rabbis. Rabbi is also found as a name for Judah ha-Nasi. The Aramaic form rabban (“our master”) is associated with some…

Rabbi (Rabban, Rabbinen, Rav), Rabbiner

(1,147 words)

Author(s): Jacobs, Martin | Wilke, Carsten | Schaller, Berndt
[English Version] I. Zum BegriffDer hebr. Titel רַבִּי/rabbî leitet sich vom Nomen רַב/rab (»groß«, »von hohem Rang«) ab, das im nachbibl. Hebr., unterschieden vom Sklaven oder Schüler (mSuk 2,9; mGit 4,4; mAv 1,3), die Bedeutung von »Meister« (Rav) annahm. Die Anrede Rabbi (R.; »mein Meister/Lehrer«) wurde zum Titel und u.a. mit den Namen paläst. Gelehrter verbunden (z.B. R. Aqiva), während Rav für bab. Rabbinen gebraucht wurde. R. kommt auch als Name für Jehuda (ha-Nasi) vor. Die aram. Form Rabban (»unser…

Aaronic Blessing

(431 words)

Author(s): Seybold, Klaus | Jacobs, Martin | Saliers, Don E.
[German Version] I. Old Testament – II. Early Judaism – III. Liturgy I. Old Testament The priestly Blessing, transmitted within the framework of the so-called Priestly Source (Pentateuch) in Num 6:23-26, which is also attested in some inscriptions (e.g. in Ketef Hinnom near Jerusalem), consist of traditional blessing formulae, linked together in three stair-stepped lines. …

David

(3,786 words)

Author(s): Dietrich, Walter | Klauck, Hans-Josef | Leeb, Rudolf | Jacobs, Martin | Dan, Joseph | Et al.
[German Version] I. Bible – II. Christianity – III. Judaism – IV. Islam I. Bible 1. Old Testament From the biblical perspective, David, whose name means “darling, beloved,” is the embodiment of the ideal ruler. He governed in the early 10th century bce, allegedly for 40 years, of which seven and a half were in Hebron, the rest in Jerusalem (2 Sam 5:4f.). Although he is the king of whom the Bible has most to tell (Kingship in Israel), he remains a …
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