Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Köpf, Ulrich" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Köpf, Ulrich" )' returned 172 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Wilhelmites

(290 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] The Wilhelmite order goes back to a hermitage (Monasticism: III) founded in Tuscany in the mid-12th century. Its founder is said to have been a French noble named Wilhelm, a former soldier who settled near Pisa in 1145 after several pilgrimages; later he moved to the mountain valley of Malavalle, near Siena, where he lived a strictly ascetic life as a hermit with a single companion (later joined by a second). After his death on Feb 10, 1157, a hermitage grew up at his burial site;…

Geography

(827 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] I. History of the Discipline – II. Church History I. History of the Discipline Geography has come a long way from its beginnings in the mythical worldview (ANE creation accounts, early Greek philosophical speculation) and in the pragmatic exploration of the world (travel reports of merchants) to its development as an exact science. In antiquity, it was understood as a comprehensive lore of the earth and its inhabitants. The earliest accounts took the form of descriptions of coasts (Periplus et al.), which were soon joined by geographic and ethnographic excu…

Lay Abbot

(106 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] A lay abbot in the narrow sense, is a layman who is entrusted with the conduct and use of a monastery without being a member of its convent or even a monk. In the Frankish Empire of the 9th and 10th centuries and its successor states, members of the nobility were particularly frequently vested with this function. In a secondary meaning, lay abbot also designates the clerical holder of a commendam, who does not have the status of a monk (frequent from the High Middle Ages to the early modern period). Ulrich Köpf Bibliography F.J. Felten, Äbte und Laienäbte im Frankenreich, 1980.

Ficino, Marsilio

(391 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] (Oct 19, 1433, Figline Valdarno, Italy – Oct 1, 1499, Careggi, Italy). Ficino was the son of the personal physician of Cosimo de' Medici; the latter supported Ficino and prompted him to change his course of studies from medicine to philosophy. He acquired an extremely thorough knowledge of Greek and produced annotated translations of esp. Plato (1463–1469), Plotinus (1484–1486), and a series of other neo-Platonic authors. In Florence he founded a Platonic Academy (I, 5) in which h…

Liechtenstein

(293 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] The principality of Liechtenstein is a microstate (160 km2) between the Swiss cantons of Sankt Gallen and Grisons (Graubünden) to the west and the Austrian state of Vorarlberg to the east. It is a hereditary constitutional monarchy with a population of 35,300 (2007), 80% Catholic, 7.4% Protestant (1996). Rulers of Liechtenstein are first mentioned in the 12th century, with two lines possessing lands in Styria and Moravia. When the Styrian line died out in 1619, the Moravian lord of Nikols…

Controversial Theology

(1,053 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] is a branch of theology that judges differences between various Christian Churches from a polemical and argumentative point of view rather than analyzing them from a historically critical perspective. The “controversy” involved relates both to the object and the method of this discipline. Theological positions are discussed when they become significant in disturbing or dividing the church community, and not so much as contributions to an open scholarly debate. I. Although the term controversial theology did not become common until the 20th century, …

Peter Cantor

(242 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] (Petrus; first half of the 12th cent., Hosdenc, near Beauvais – 1197, Cistercian abbey of Longpont, near Soissons). Sometime before 1173, after studying at the cathedral school in Reims, he began teaching at the cathedral school in Paris as a canon; in 1183 he was appointed to the post of cantor. He refused his election as bishop of Paris in 1196. In 1197 he was elected dean of the cathedral chapter of Reims, but died on his journey from Paris. Numerous works, some still unpublished, bear witness to his teaching activity: glosses on the Old and New Testaments; Distinctiones or S…

Cathedral Schools

(471 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] were educational originally institutions for training clergy, administered by the episcopal curia. In the Early Church, learned bishops (preeminently Augustine) already gave instruction to their clergy. From the second Council of Toledo (527/531) onward, the Church repeatedly urged the establishment of episcopal schools; in 789, they were ¶ enjoined by Charlemagne, and in 1076 by Gregory VII. Nevertheless, down to the Reformation numerous councils deplored the educational level of the clergy – a sign of the great dispari…

Reform, Idea of

(2,727 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] In classical Latin, the verb reformare and the associated noun reformatio already denoted a transformation for the better: restoration of an earlier human condition, since lost (morality e.g. Pliny the Younger Panegyricus 53.1: “corruptos depravatosque mores . . . reformare et corrigere”; bodily health e.g. Theodorus Priscianus Euproiston 1.38: “oculorum aciem reformare”), or physical objects (e.g. Solinus, Collectanea rerum memorabilium 40.5: “templum reformare”) or improvement without regard to the past (e.g. Sen. Ep. 58.26: “reformatio morum”; Ep. 94.5…

Recluses/Hermits

(442 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] Recluses or hermits are men and women who do penance by shutting themselves (or having themselves shut) into a cell, either for a specific period (usually at the beginning of their lives as ascetics) or for the rest of their lives. This extreme form of asceticism surfaced in the Early Church in all regions of the East where there were monastic settlements (e.g. in Egypt, John of Lycopolis; esp. common in Syria) and came to the West in the 6th century, but it reached its climax in …

Vikings

(188 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] The Vikings were marauding seafarers from Scandinavia, who plagued large sections of Europe from ¶ the 8th century to the 11th century. Swedes descended on Novgorod and Kiev via the Gulf of Finland, advancing as far as the Black Sea (Varangians). Norwegians conquered Scotland and the northern and eastern parts of Ireland, settled Iceland, and sailed as far as Greenland, Newfoundland, and Nova Scotia. Danes settled between the mouths of the Oder and Vistula and landed on the southern and eastern …

Remigius of Auxerre (Saint)

(119 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] (after 841 – May 2, probably 908, Paris), a monk from the monastery of St. Germain in Auxerre, where he succeeded his teacher Heiric ( Heiricus). Remigius was involved in the renewal of the school of Reims around 893 and taught in Paris from 900 onward. He authored more than 20 works that were widely read in the Middle Ages, although most of them have never been printed: commentaries on ancient and early medieval grammarians and poets, on Genesis and the Psalms, and on Boethius’s De consolatione philosophiae and Opuscula sacra; he also wrote an exposition of the mass. Ulrich Kö…

Libri sententiarum

(992 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] Authoritative dicta with significant content (Gk γνώμη/ gnṓmē [earliest: Sophoc. Ajax 1091] alongside more specialized terms; Lat. sententia [since Cicero]) were already in use in pre-Christian times in literary and rhetorical contexts; later they were collected for more convenient use ( gnomology, similar to anthology [Florilegium]). Examples are Μενάνδρου γνώμαι μονόστιχοι/ Menándrou gnṓmai monóstichoi ¶ (probably begun in the 2nd cent. bce; continued into the Byzantine period) and Σέξτου γνώμαι/ Séxtou gnṓmai (c. 200 ce). During the Trinitarian contr…

Wilhelmina

(298 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] von Böhmen (von Mailand; gest.1278/1281 Mailand). Einzige Quelle sind die Akten des 1300 postum gegen W. und ihre Anhänger geführten Inquisitionsprozesses, aus denen ihre hochadlige Herkunft aus Böhmen hervorzugehen scheint. Ihr Leben vor ihrer Ankunft in Mailand (zw. 1260 und 1270) ist unbekannt; doch soll sie einen Sohn gehabt haben. In Mailand, das nicht nur durch Streit mit anderen oberital. Städten und interne Parteikämpfe, sondern auch durch jahrelange Konflikte mit der röm.…

Robert Kilwardby

(206 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] (gest.10.9.1279 in Viterbo). Erstes sicheres Datum aus seinem Leben ist seine Wahl zum Provinzialmagister der engl. Dominikaner im September 1261. Von hier aus lassen sich frühere Daten erschließen: in den 30er Jahren Studium an der Pariser Artistenfakultät, ca.1237 M.A., Lehrtätigkeit in Paris bis Mitte der 40er Jahre, dann Rückkehr nach England und Eintritt in den Predigerorden, Studium der Theol. in Oxford (ca.1252–1254 Sentenzenvorlesung), 1254 Magister regens der Theol. Seit…

Quaestio

(363 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] . Die echte, nicht »rhetorische«, sondern auf eine problemlösende Antwort abzielende Frage (griech. ζη´τημα/zē´tēma, προ´βλημα/pro´blēma, α᾿πορι´α/apori´a, lat. quaestio) ist ein elementares Mittel rationaler Argumentation. Sie begegnet schon in vorchristl. Zeit bei den Griechen (seit dem sokratischen Fragen des platonischen Dialogs) wie im rabb. Judentum (im Gespräch zw. Lehrer und Schüler). Das Formulieren von Fragen wurde schon früh in der altkirchl. Theol. üblich (erster Höhepunkt bei Au…

Subiaco

(178 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] Subiaco, Ort in Latium, im Anienetal östlich von Rom. Hier soll sich Benedikt von Nursia zunächst als Eremit in einer Höhle (Sacro Speco), dann mit Gefährten in Räumen einer ehem. Villa Kaiser Neros (Kloster San Clemente) niedergelassen haben. In der Folgezeit soll er zehn weitere Klöster gegründet haben, bevor er sich um 529 nach Monte Cassino begab. Heute bestehen noch zwei von ihnen: San Benedetto (Sacro Speco) und – tiefer gelegen – Santa Scholastica (urspr. San Silvestro), d…

Reformierte Hohe Schulen in Deutschland

(441 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] . Zu den zentralen Forderungen der Wittenberger wie der Schweizer Reformation gehörte eine gründliche theol. Ausbildung aller künftigen Geistlichen. Während in luth. Territorien die reformierten theol. Fakultäten an vorhandenen Universitäten dieser Aufgabe dienten, fehlten in ref. Gebieten solche Einrichtungen zunächst weitgehend. Nur drei bestehende Volluniversitäten hatten zeitweise ref. Charakter: Heidelberg 1559–1578 und 1583–1622, Marburg 1605–1624 und wieder seit 1653, Fran…

Reformation

(6,474 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] I. Zum Begriff Unter R. (von lat. reformatio) verstehen wir heute ausschließlich die durch M. Luther, U. Zwingli u.a. Reformatoren ausgelösten Vorgänge, die im Laufe des 16.Jh. zu einer bis heute fortdauernden Aufspaltung der abendländischen Christenheit führten. Bis ins 19.Jh. hinein hatte der Begriff dagegen noch die urspr., weite Bedeutung von Reform (Reformgedanke), unter die aber immer auch das Geschehen der R. subsumiert war. Erst das Aufkommen des franz. Wortes réforme im 17…

Valdes

(142 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] (gest. ca.1205/1218). Die spärliche Überlieferung erlaubt nur wenige sichere Aussagen über V.; ein Taufname (Petrus) wird nicht vor der 2. Hälfte des 14.Jh. genannt. Der wohlhabende Bürger aus Lyon scheint ca.1176/77 durch die Alexius-Legende oder in die Volkssprache übers. Bibeltexte zu einem apostolischen Leben bekehrt worden zu sein. Ob dabei dem Armutsideal oder dem Wunsch nach Predigttätigkeit Priorität zukommt, ist umstritten. Nach Versorgung seiner Frau und seiner beiden T…
▲   Back to top   ▲