Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Kleinkopf, Kathryn" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Kleinkopf, Kathryn" )' returned 3 results. Modify search

Did you mean: dc_creator:( "kleinkopf, kathryn" ) OR dc_contributor:( "kleinkopf, kathryn" )

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Paula

(1,451 words)

Author(s): Kleinkopf, Kathryn
Paula (May 5, 347–Jan 26, 404 CE) was born in Rome to a wealthy senatorial family. Her mother, Blesilla, purportedly descended from the Gracchi and the Scipiones, while her father, Rogatus, traced his lineage back to Agamemnon (Jer. Ep. 108.1.1; 108.13.1). While little is known of Paula’s childhood, she married Iulius Toxotius in the 360s CE when she was still a young teenager. From this union resulted five children: Blesilla, Paulina, Eustochium, Rufina, and Toxotius.In 381 CE, the death of her husband allowed Paula to choose celibacy and to dedicate herself entirely…
Date: 2020-09-21

Marcella

(2,803 words)

Author(s): Kleinkopf, Kathryn
Marcella (325–410 CE) was born in Rome to Albina and an unnamed father, a descendant of a long line of consuls and praetorian prefects (Jer. Ep. 127.1). Marcella lost her father at an early age and was quickly married thereafter. Losing men in her young life continued, as after only seven months of marriage Marcella’s husband died, leaving her widowed ( Ep. 127.2). As was custom, Albina encouraged her daughter to remarry, not only on account of her youth but also to secure her livelihood ( Ep. 127.2). Cerealis, an older man of consular rank, thus attempted to court Marcella, prom…
Date: 2020-09-21

Pelagia

(1,315 words)

Author(s): Kleinkopf, Kathryn
Pelagia (late 2nd, and early 3rd cent. CE) was an Antiochene virgin who lived presumably around the time of the Diocletianic persecutions in 303 CE (Burrus, 2003, 149). She resided in a house with her mother and sisters, where they dedicated themselves to a life of chastity and asceticism. When Pelagia was 15 years old, a mob came to her home in order to haul her out onto the street and possibly to court (Ambr. Virg. 3.33; Chry. Pelag. 1). Both Ambrose of Milan and John Chrysostom, her only biographers, cast these aggressors as would-be rapists who sought to defile the bo…
Date: 2020-09-21