Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)" )' returned 66 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Gerasa

(366 words)

Author(s): Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Syria | Theatre | Hasmonaeans | Pilgrimage | Pompeius (modern Ǧaraš). City located 34 km north of Ammān. Thanks to a stream with the ancient name of Chrysorrhoas, G. was a place of settlement from the time of the early Stone Age. It is therefore reasonable to assume that a settlement already existed when the Macedonians, mentioned in a Roman inscription, introduced the Greek element ─ contrary to legends that  Alexander [4] the Great,  Perdiccas, or  A…

Dekapolis

(414 words)

Author(s): Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
[German version] (ἡ Δεκάπολις; hē Dekápolis). Term for a territory comprising a varying number of cities and with a predominantly Greek population, concentrated in northern Trans-Jordan, southern Syria and northern Palestine. Although some towns later to belong to the Dekapolis had already been in existence in pre-Hellenistic times, most of them claimed to have been founded by  Alexander [4] the Great. Archaeological investigations, however, have shown that the development of many towns into urban centres began only under Seleucid an…

Rusafa

(220 words)

Author(s): Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Pilgrimage ( Ruṣāfa; in the Byzantine era also Sergiopolis). Ruins in central Syria, c. 180 km east of Aleppo and 35 south of the Euphrates. Roman limes fortress (Limes [VI D], with map) beginning in the 1st cent. BC. In Late Antiquity, the town, where the officer Sergius suffered martyrdom under Diocletianus (cf. [1]), became the central pilgrimage destination for Christian Arab tribes of the Levant and Mesopotamia. R. had churches from the 5th cent. AD on, including t…

Bambyce

(244 words)

Author(s): Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Syria | Zenobia | Limes (Βαμβύκη; Bambýkē). City in North Syria, 78 km north-east of Aleppo at the confluence of the Sadjur and the Euphrates. B. (Str. 16,2,7) was since Seleucus I known as the Syrian Ἱεράπολις, Hierápolis (Str. 16,1,27, Ptol. 5,14,10), but at the same time also as Mabbog (Plin. HN 5, 81) with the Graecized form, Μέμπετξε (Leo Diaconus, 165,22; from which the Arabic Manbiǧ). The position, generally identified with the Assyrian settlement Nappigi/Nampigi, possesse…

Abila

(244 words)

Author(s): Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Pompeius Town (mod. Quwailibeh) 15 km north-west of Irbid (Jordan). The ruins of A. cover an area of c. 1.5 km × 0.5 km, which comprises two hills, Tell A. and Khirbat Umm al-Amad [1. 1 f.] to the south. The settlement, which had been continuously settled from the 3rd millennium BC to the Iron Age, was refounded under the Seleucids. Polybius (5,69-70) noted its conquest by Antiochus III in 218 BC. Its inclusion in the  Decapolis occurred no later than at that time. Remains of a street grid with cardo and decumanus, a theatre and aq…

Gadara

(263 words)

Author(s): Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Syria | Theatre | Hasmonaeans | Pilgrimage | Pompeius (modern Umm Qais). Town in north-eastern Transjordania, east of Lake Gennesareth; traces of settlement date back to the 7th cent. BC. After the fall of the Achaemenid kingdom ( Achaemenids), the district of G. came under the control of the Ptolemies for a short period, but became part of the Seleucid kingdom under  Antiochus [5] III in 198 BC. For some time, the name of the town appears on coins as S…

Damghan

(176 words)

Author(s): Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
[German version] (Dāmġān). Town in Iran on the southern foothills of the Alborz, 342 km east of Teheran on the road to Nīšāpūr. The name possibly arose from the contraction of Deh-e Moġān (village of the Magi). The prehistoric antecedent of D. is Tepe Ḥeṣār with layers between the 5th millennium and the early 2nd millennium BC. After a hiatus of 1,500 years D. became the main settlement of the Parthian and Sassanid province of Qūmes, site of one of the holy state fires (ātaxš-ī xwarišnīh, ‘unfed f…

Irāq al-Amı̄r

(102 words)

Author(s): Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
[German version] (Araq al-Amir). The ruins of I. and Qaṣr al-ʿAbd are located in Wādī al-Sīr, to the west of present-day Amman. From Achaemenid times it was a domain of the  Tobiads (Neh. 2,10; 2,19; 3,33; 3,35). I. consists of two man-made cave galleries, about 300 m in length. Lying above on a plateau, the palace or monument structure with animal reliefs (Qaṣr al-ʿAbd) belonged to the fortification (βάρις) of Tyre of the Tobiad  Hyrcanus [1], founded in 181 BC (Jos. Ant. Iud. 12, 229-234). Leisten, Thomas (Princeton) Bibliography E. Will, F. Larché et al., I.: Le château du Tobiade…

Chorāsān

(257 words)

Author(s): Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
[German version] Middle Persian xwarsārān, ‘[Land of the] Sunrise, the East’. Nowadays denotes the north-eastern part of Iran, with Mašhad as its administrative centre. In the pre-Islamic and early Islamic period C. included parts of Central Asia and western Afghanistan. It was under the Sassanids that C. first formed one of the four great provincial satrapies; it was ruled by a Spāhpat with his seat in Merv, having jurisdiction over the following districts (Yaqūbī, Tarīḫ I, 201): Nīšāpūr, Harāt…

Samarra

(509 words)

Author(s): Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
[German version] ( Sāmarrā; Theophanes Continuatus 3,36: Σάμαρα/ Sámara). Area of ruins of c. 60 km2 and modern town on the left bank of the Tigris, 100 km north of Baghdad (cf. map). At this site, known since the neo-Assyrian Period (Mesopotamia III D), the emperor Julian [11] the Apostate fell in AD 363 in battle against the Sassanids. It was in this area, mainly inhabited by Nestorians (Nestorius), that the Nahrawān canal, dug in the time of Chosroes [5] Anushirvan (period of rule 531-579) began, which be…

Bambyke

(209 words)

Author(s): Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
[English version] Dieser Ort ist auf folgenden Karten verzeichnet: Limes | Syrien | Zenobia (Βαμβύκη). Stadt in Nordsyrien, 78 km nordöstl. von Aleppo am Zusammenfluß von Sadjur und Euphrat. B. (Strab. 16,2,7) war seit Seleukos I. als das syr. Ἱεράπολις, Hierápolis (Strab 16,1,27, Ptol. 5,14,10), gleichzeitig aber auch als Mabbog (Plin. nat. 5, 81) mit der gräzisierten Form, Μέμπετξε (Leo Diaconus, 165,22; daraus arab. Manbiǧ), bekannt. Der Ort, allg. mit der assyr. Siedlung Nappigi/Nampigi identifiziert, besaß durch die Nähe einer w…

Gerasa

(306 words)

Author(s): Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
[English version] Dieser Ort ist auf folgenden Karten verzeichnet: Hasmonäer | Pilgerschaft | Pompeius | Syrien | Theater (h. Ǧaraš). 34 km nördl. von Ammān gelegener Ort. Dank eines Baches, dem Chrysorrhoas der Ant., war G. seit der frühen Steinzeit Siedlungsort. Daher ist anzunehmen, daß die in einer röm. Inschr. erwähnten Makedonier das griech. Element in eine bereits bestehende Siedlung einführten und entgegen den Legenden nicht erst Alexandros [4] d.Gr., Perdikkas oder Antiochos [2] I. Stadtgründer waren. I…

Rusafa

(204 words)

Author(s): Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
[English version] Dieser Ort ist auf folgenden Karten verzeichnet: Pilgerschaft ( Ruṣāfa; in byz. Zeit auch Sergiupolis). Ruine in Zentralsyrien, ca. 180 km östl. von Aleppo und 35 km südl. des Euphrat. Röm. Limesfestung (Limes VI. D., mit Karte) seit dem 1. Jh. v. Chr. Der Ort, an dem unter Diocletianus der Offizier Sergios das Martyrium erlitt (vgl. [1]), wurde in der Spätant. zum zentralen Pilgerzentrum christl. arabischer Stämme der Levante und Mesopotamiens. Seit dem 5. Jh. n. Chr. besaß R. Kirchen, d…

Chorāsān

(225 words)

Author(s): Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
[English version] Mittelpersisch xwarsārān, “[Land des] Sonnenaufgang[s], Osten”. Bezeichnet heute den nordöstl. Teil Irans, mit Mašhad als administrativem Zentrum. In vor- und frühislamischer Zeit umfaßte Ch. zusätzlich Teile Zentralasiens und Westafghanistans. Unter den Sasaniden bildete Ch. erstmals eine der vier großen Provinzsatrapien, regiert durch einen Spāhpat mit Sitz in Marw, dem folgende Distrikte unterstanden (Yaqūbī, Tarīḫ I, 201): Nīšāpūr, Harāt, Marw, Marw ar-Rūḏ, Fāryāb, Ṭālaqān,…

Gadara

(233 words)

Author(s): Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
[English version] Dieser Ort ist auf folgenden Karten verzeichnet: Hasmonäer | Pilgerschaft | Pompeius | Syrien | Theater (h. Umm Qais). Ort im nordöstl. Transjordanland, östl. des Sees Genezareth, weist Besiedlungsspuren auf, die bis in das 7. Jh. v.Chr. datieren. Nach dem Zerfall des Achämenidenreiches (Achaimenidai) wurde das Gebiet von G. für kurze Zeit von den Ptolemäern kontrolliert, aber unter Antiochos [5] III. im J. 198 v.Chr. dem Seleukidenreich eingegliedert. Zeitweilig wurde der Name der Stadt auf Mz.…

Dura-Europos

(268 words)

Author(s): Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
[English version] Dieser Ort ist auf folgenden Karten verzeichnet: Christentum | Handel | Hellenistische Staatenwelt | Limes | Sāsāniden | Syrien | Zenobia Stadt auf dem Westufer des mittleren Euphrat (arab. aṣ-Ṣāliḥiya, südöstl. Syrien). D.-E. wurde ca. 300 v.Chr. von maked. Kolonisten als eine der seleukidischen Festungen zur Sicherung der Euphratverbindungen gegründet. Nach der parth. Eroberung ca. 141 v.Chr. Aufstieg zum Militärposten und zur wichtigen Station auf der Karawanenroute nach Palmyra. Die Vorstöße Trai…

Bostra

(282 words)

Author(s): Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
[English version] Dieser Ort ist auf folgenden Karten verzeichnet: Christentum | Coloniae | Legio | Limes | Sāsāniden | Syrien | Theater | Zenobia | Straßen Kleinstadt am Südrand der syr. Basaltwüste (Ḥaurān). Der h. Name Buṣrā korrespondiert mit der nabatäischen und palmyrenischen Form BṢR (“Festung”). B. war seit der Früh-Brz. besiedelt und pflegte als Karawanenstadt und Durchgangsort nach Nordsyrien und zum Roten Meer im 2. Jt. regen Kontakt mit Ägypten (inschr. Erwähnungen seit der 12. Dynastie in Saqqara, Karnak, A…

Lachmiden

(143 words)

Author(s): Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
[English version] (arab. Banū Laḫm). Könige des arab. Stammesverbandes der Tanūḫ (2. Viertel 3. Jh. - Anf. 7. Jh. n.Chr). Sitz der L. war al-Ḥīra, ein Karawanenzentrum im sw Irak, südl. von Kerbela. Als Vasallen der pers. Sāsāniden überwachten die L. die Stämme der arab. Halbinsel und beteiligten sich am Kampf der Sāsāniden gegen Rom, später gegen Byzanz und ihre syr. Verbündeten (Palmyra, Ghassaniden). Einige L. waren nestorianische Christen (Nestorianismus); durch sie wurde Ḥīra ein Zentrum des Ch…

Baalbek

(248 words)

Author(s): Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
[English version] Dieser Ort ist auf folgenden Karten verzeichnet: Coloniae | Kleinasien | Syrien | Theater Ort in der Biqa-Ebene zw. Libanon und Antilibanon in 1150 m Höhe, 64 km nordöstl. von Beirut. Die Umbenennung von B. in Heliopolis (Strab. 753; Plin. nat. 5,80) geschah wohl im Zusammenhang mit der Identifizierung des “Baal (Haddad) der Biqa” mit dem ägypt. Sonnengott Ra/Helios durch die Ptolemäer von Alexandreia. Nach vorübergehender Herrschaft der Seleukiden (2.Jh. v.Chr.) wurde B. Kultzentrum der it…

Damghan

(158 words)

Author(s): Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
[English version] (Dāmġān). Stadt in Iran an den Südausläufern des Alborz, 342 km östl. von Teheran an der Straße nach Nīšāpūr. Der Name entstand möglicherweise aus Kontraktion von Deh-e Moġān (Dorf der Magi). Prähist. Vorläufer D.s ist der Tepe Ḥeṣār mit Schichten zwischen 5. Jt. und frühem 2. Jt.v.Chr. Nach einem Hiatus von 1500 Jahren wurde D. die Hauptsiedlung der parth. und sāsānidischen Provinz Qūmes, Sitz eines der hl. Staatsfeuer (ātaxš-ī xwarišnīh, “Feuer ohne Nahrung”, daher Zoroastrier …
▲   Back to top   ▲