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Consecutio Temporum et Modorum

(2,282 words)

Author(s): Maria Napoli
Abstract The Greek language does not show any systematic form of consecutio temporum, i.e., a cluster of morphological and syntactic rules governing the sequence and agreement of tenses in matrix clauses and subordinate clauses. The relative temporal value assumed by present and aorist mainly in the infinitive and participle, to denote simultaneity and anteriority, respectively, is explainable in terms of tendencies rather than of rigid grammatical rules. An instance of consecutio modorum is represented, instead, by the use of the oblique optative, which substitute…
Date: 2013-11-01

Verb Phrase

(4,709 words)

Author(s): Maria Napoli
Abstract By definition, a verb phrase is a phrase (i.e., a word or a sequence of words which functions as a single unit in the sentence, forming a constituent) the head of which is a verb. In the literature on Greek, it is not unanimously accepted that the verb and its direct object form a verb phrase. What is disputed, in other words, is the theoretical usefulness of this notion if applied to Greek. Indeed, features such as free word order, discontinuity (including hyperbaton), lack of expletive…
Date: 2013-11-01

Aorist

(860 words)

Author(s): Maria Napoli
Abstract Although the aorist is traditionally defined as a temporal stem, its function in the Greek verbal system is primarily aspectual: it corresponds to the cross-linguistic category of perfective aspect, by representing the event as a single whole. The indicative also has a temporal meaning, in being a past tense, whereas the non-indicative moods only have an aspectual function.   The aorist is one of the so-called temporal stems of the Greek verbal system (Aorist Formation, Aorist ( aóristos), Ancient Theories of). However, its function is primarily aspectual (Aspect…
Date: 2013-11-01

Attraction (Mood, Case etc.)

(4,781 words)

Author(s): Maria Napoli
Abstract Attraction has been described as the phenomenon taking place when a given word does not show the grammatical form expected on the basis of the canonical morphological and/or syntactic rules, but appears in a different form because of the influence of another word in the same clause or in a different clause. In Greek, attraction is not obligatory. It occurs at three distinct levels: (i) It may involve the feature of agreement: in particular, a verb can be attracted by an attributive phras…
Date: 2013-11-01