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Demetrian of Antioch

(789 words)

Author(s): Maritano, Mario
Demetrian was elected bishop of Antioch in 253 CE in succession to Fabian (see Eus. Hist. eccl. 6.46.4 and 7.14; Chron. Olym 258.1). He actively opposed the heresy of Novatus, a rigorous heretic as regards penance (see Eus. Hist. eccl. 7.5.1; see Sisto, 1994). In 256 CE the Persians, led by King Shapur I, invaded Antioch and deported the inhabitants of various cities to Persia. Even Bishop Demetrian, together with many inhabitants of Antioch, was confined to the city of Bendoshapur/Gundaisabur (see Peeters, 1924; Chaumont, 1986, 119–…
Date: 2020-09-21

Decretum Gelasianum

(1,260 words)

Author(s): Maritano, Mario
The Decretum Gelasianum de libris recipiendis et non recipiendis (text in Dobschütz, 1912) is a document of an anonymous author, attributed to Pope Gelasius I (492–496 CE: see Taylor, 1974–1975; Bratož, 1999; 2000; Neil & Allen, 2014) but is posterior and may be dated to the 6th century CE: it may have been written in southern Gaul or northern Italy by a layperson or perhaps a member of the clergy (see Leclercq, 1924, 735–758; Schwartz, 1930).StructureThe document is made up of five separate chapters (see Kleinhans, 1950; Pietri, 1976). The first chapter speaks about t…
Date: 2020-09-21

Basileiad

(1,760 words)

Author(s): Maritano, Mario
Basil, bishop of Cappadocia from 370 to 379 CE, built a "new city," as it was called by Gregory of Nazianzus ( Or. 43; 63), which, in honor of its founder, was then called "Basileiad" (see Soz. Hist. eccl. 6.34.9: "Basileiad, a famous hospice for the poor which was founded by Basil, bishop of Caesarea, from which at the beginning it took the name it keeps today" around 450 CE; Fir. Ep. 43 speaks of "the poor who live in Basileiad"): it had been created for the needs of the weak and destitute, to heal the sick and to give shelter to the poor and to pilgrims (see Gie…
Date: 2020-09-21

Cornelius (Bishop of Rome)

(1,698 words)

Author(s): Maritano, Mario
Cornelius, the son of Castinus, was born in Rome (see LP, vol. I, 150n22), was elected bishop of Rome in March/April of 251 CE, and died in June 253 CE at Centumcellae (Civitavecchia), where he had been exiled (see Caspar, 1930; Bardy, 1956; Gordini, 1964; Leclercq, 1948; Simonetti, 2000a; Seppelt, 1962).His predecessor, Fabian, had died a martyr's death on Jan 20, 250 CE, at the beginning of the persecution of Decius, who wanted to restore paganism (see Frend, 1965, 389–439; Sordi, 1965, 261–281; 1984, 110–116; Pietri & Pietri, 2000, 156–166).…
Date: 2020-09-21

Cataphrygians

(2,783 words)

Author(s): Maritano, Mario
The name Cataphrygians was given to the followers of Montanus, a name derived from the place where this movement originated, between Phrygia and Mysia, in the second half of the 2nd century CE (see Markschies, 2012, 1197–1199; Berruto Martone, 1999, 127–130). From the beginning, ancient Christian authors used the expression “the Phygrian heresy” (Eus. Hist. eccl. 5.16.1; 5.18.1; 6.20.3), or even more briefly “Phrygians” (Clem. Strom. 4.93.1; 7.108.2; Anonimus ap. Eus. Hist. eccl. 5.16.22), “according to the Phrygians” (Epiph. Haer. 48.1.1; 48.1.3; 49.1; in Lat. secundum Phrygas: …
Date: 2020-09-21