Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Rafael SUTER" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Rafael SUTER" )' returned 4 results. Modify search

Did you mean: dc_creator:( "rafael SUTER" ) OR dc_contributor:( "rafael SUTER" )

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Philosophy of Language: Pre-Qín through Eastern Hàn

(13,828 words)

Author(s): Rafael SUTER
Reflection about language in China goes back to the beginnings of Chinese literature traditionally dated into the 9th cent. BCE. As an academic discipline, “philosophy” reached China at the turn from the 19th to the 20th century. The term zhéxué 哲學 is a 19th century Sino-Japanese neologism. Although the philosophy of language and its 19th century offspring, scientific linguistics, only arrived in the early 20th century, the problems of the philosophy of language have been discussed in China in various institutional contexts for…
Date: 2017-03-02

Philosophy of Language: Eastern Hàn, Medieval and Later Developments

(5,317 words)

Author(s): Rafael SUTER
1. Introduction Since the late Western Hàn dynasty (206–9 CE), Chinese elite culture had become predominantly literary (Loewe 1999:986; Nylan 2001:32; Kern 2001). While official discourse relied on the normative standards enshrined in the “Confucian” canon (Nylan 2001), from the Wèi-Jìn period (220–420 CE) onwards, the
Date: 2017-03-02

Graham, Angus C. (1919-1991)

(3,728 words)

Author(s): Rafael SUTER
Graham, Angus Charles, 1919–1991. Sinologist, philosopher, author of a dozen monographs and some 60 articles (Rosemont, ed. 1991:323–328). Born in Penarth, Wales, he spent part of his youth in British Malaya. He read Theology at Oxford, graduating in 1940. Joining the RAF during WW II, he learnt Japanese and served as an interpreter. In 1946, Graham enrolled in the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) of the University o…
Date: 2017-03-02

Philosophy of Language: Buddhist Theories of Language

(4,442 words)

Author(s): Rafael SUTER
1. Basic Views and Terminology  Chinese Buddhism mainly continues different strands of Mahāyāna traditions (Williams 2009). Their perspective on language is defined by the basic view that all things ‘arise in co-dependence’ ( yuánqǐ 緣起, Skrt. pratītyasamutpada), that they are ‘empty’ ( kōng 空, śūnya) of intrinsic nature ( zìxìng 自性, svabhāva), and independent existence. Buddhist theories of language reject the idea that words represent things: Bodhiruci’s (Pútíliúzhī 菩提流支, fl. 508 CE) translation of the Laṅkāvatāra-sūtra (T16.671, Rùlèngjiā jīng 入楞伽經 'Sūtra on (Buddha’s) descent into Laṅkā'; Suzuki 1932 transl.), presents the criticized realist position as follows: “Where there is a linguistic expression, there must be [corresponding] entities ( 法, dharma
Date: 2017-03-02