Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Reichmuth, Stefan" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Reichmuth, Stefan" )' returned 39 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

God

(7,822 words)

Author(s): Laube, Martin | Reichmuth, Stefan | Kummels, Ingrid | Rüther, Kirsten
1. Christianity 1.1. Preliminary noteOne of the unique aspects of Christianity is that from the very outset it developed a theology, and in order to explicate its own faith made use of the conceptual tools of contemporary (i.e. Greek and Roman) philosophy. This interweaving of theological and philosophical thought was constantly reflected quintessentially in the doctrine of God. A series of fundamental tensions pervaded the development of the idea of God even in the early modern period. These includ…
Date: 2019-10-14

Language, literary

(18,024 words)

Author(s): Lüsebrink, Hans-Jürgen | Reichmuth, Stefan | Schwarze, Sabine | Gil, Alberto | Rothmund, Elisabeth | Et al.
1. Introduction 1.1. PrinciplesA literary language, also known as an official, high, standard, cultural, or art language, language of literature, etcetera, is a language used in literature shaped by aesthetic considerations. The development of literary languages in the early modern period displays two fundamental dimensions. First, in the transition from the Middle Ages to the early modern period there was an increasing use of the vernacular in place of Latin in literary texts, and secondly specifi…
Date: 2019-10-14

Cultural contact, global

(9,702 words)

Author(s): Rinke, Stefan | Falola, Toyin | Aderinto, Saheed | Reichmuth, Stefan | Liebau, Heike | Et al.
1. Introduction The term cultural contact was long taken to mean the meeting of different cultural units that was homogenous and static in themselves. Modern approaches to an understanding of the concept proceed on the basis of a different idea of culture, seeing it as a “self-woven web of meaning” [3. 9] in human consciousness, subject to perpetual change in dynamic processes of the construction of symbols. Interpretations are thus made both individually and collectively, and these give rise to meanings and identities. This interpretation br…
Date: 2019-10-14

Muslim societies

(7,555 words)

Author(s): Reichmuth, Stefan
1. Problems of perceptionMuch as in Christian Europe, there was great continuity in forms of Muslim society and culture from the Middle Ages to the early modern period. European travelers and observers at the time generally made no such distinction of period. Indeed, growing contacts between Europeans and Muslim regions engendered in Europeans, through their exchanges, an image of Islam that incorporated the entire Islamic past in an effectively timeless perception. Even in the late 17th century, t…
Date: 2020-04-06

Nomad

(4,040 words)

Author(s): Bley, Helmut | Nolte, Hans-Heinrich | Reichmuth, Stefan | Hölck, Lasse
1. IntroductionIt is striking in the context of the world history of the early modern period and the global interaction that characterized it that the dominance of nomadic and cattle-farming societies over sedentary peasant societies waned from around the 15th century. Nomads had become strong in Asia and Africa thanks to the military superiority of their mounted armies, generally in combination with the recruitment of sedentary peasants [28], the conquest of cities, the seizure of administrative structures, and the securing of major transregional tradin…
Date: 2020-04-06

Mahdi movements

(837 words)

Author(s): Reichmuth, Stefan
1. Early Islam“The Rightly-Guided One” (Arabic  al-mahdī) in Islam is an attribute of the prophet and his first successors, the Caliphs, whose “right guidance” (Arabic  al-hudā) by God was generally recognized by early Muslims. This consensus collapsed in the course of the rapid expansion of the Caliphate and in the deep conflicts of interest that came with the construction of state institutions and the distribution of profits from conquest. For a time, these led to the splitting of the Caliphate and two early Muslim civil wars (656-661, 683-692 CE).The hope for the restoration…
Date: 2019-10-14

Mosque

(2,034 words)

Author(s): Reichmuth, Stefan | Gierlichs, Joachim
1. History and functionsThe mosque (Arabic  masjid, “place of prostration for prayer”) [4] as a building for mandatory community prayers, especially Friday prayers, was already developing into the central religious and cultural institution of Islamic communities in the earliest phase of Islam, used for an abundance of communal and political functions (e.g. political addresses, announcements, and consultations, administration of justice, accommodation of guests). Along with the large, central Friday mosques (Arabic  jami`), the growth of Muslim cities spawned a p…
Date: 2020-04-06

Occultism

(2,147 words)

Author(s): Stengel, Friedemann | Reichmuth, Stefan
1. EuropeOccultism took institutional shape in Europe in 1875, with the foundation of the Theosophical Society by Helena Petrovna Blavatsky and Henry Steel Olcott (Theosophy). At the same time, it developed as a theoretical system opposed to contemporary materialism and directed against the established churches, and closely associated with 19th-century esoterica. The essence of this theory was the assumption of immaterial, supra-sensory forces arising from a “fluid,” “astral light,” or “animal so…
Date: 2020-04-06

Conversion between faiths

(8,464 words)

Author(s): Siebenhüner, Kim | Bock, Heike | Carl, Gesine | Helbig, Annekathrin | Reichmuth, Stefan | Et al.
1. General considerations 1.1. Terminology In religious and cultural history conversion (Lat. conversio; “turn-about,” “transformation”) means a person's change of religion or confession. Conversion between religions and confessions is not always easily distinguishable from the experience of conversion per se: while the latter is more to do with commitment to a (more) spiritual life and a turn to God, conversion between religions is a conversion with the acknowledgment of a new religious truth, often associated with a new confession of faith [2] (Faith; Confession of faith…
Date: 2019-10-14

Islam

(9,689 words)

Author(s): Reichmuth, Stefan | Bobzin, Hartmut
1. Introduction By the dawn of the early modern period, Islam was the religion of the overwhelming majority of the populations of its historic heartlands in the Near and Middle East and North Africa. It was also growing in South and Southeast Asia as far as China, and in sub-Saharan Africa. It was also represented in Europe in Spain, the Balkans, and the Tatar Khanates. Prior to the end of Islamic rule in Spain (1492) and the beginning of European expansion and the Christian mission in the America…
Date: 2019-10-14

Knowledge systems beyond Europe

(14,466 words)

Author(s): König, Hans-Joachim | Reichmuth, Stefan | Raina, Dhruv | Mittag, Achim | Mathias, Regine
1. Introduction The beginnings of a project to “conquer nature” that became apparent in European science and technology from the late 18th and early 19th centuries, and the sense of superiority this engendered, distorted views of the accomplishments of non-European civilizations (World perception) [2. 81 ff.]. This was particularly true of perceptions of and attitudes towards the countries of Asia and the “Orient” as a whole (Orientalism). During the 16th and 17th centuries, this region of the world had found its way to an albeit volatil…
Date: 2019-10-14

Literate cultures beyond Europe

(5,913 words)

Author(s): Bley, Helmut | Reichmuth, Stefan | Rinke, Stefan | Schmidt-Glintzer, Helwig | Frese, Heiko
1. IntroductionTo be considered first in this exploration of the non-European literate cultures are the various manuscript cultures that developed independent dynamics in many parts of Asia and Africa and among the indigenous cultures of Central and South America (American indigenous peoples; see below, 3.). Specific interrelations with oral forms of textual culture are evident here. Also important is the issue of the spread of printing with movable type, which reached other continents from Europ…
Date: 2019-10-14

Gott

(10,488 words)

Author(s): Laube, Martin | Reichmuth, Stefan | Krochmalnik, Daniel | Herausgeber: Julian Holter | Kummels, Ingrid | Et al.
1. Christentum 1.1. VorbemerkungZur Eigenart des Christentums gehört, dass es von Anbeginn eine Theologie ausbildete und sich zur Auslegung des eigenen Glaubens der begrifflichen Mittel der zeitgenössischen, d. h. zunächst der griech. und röm. Philosophie bediente. In der G.-Lehre fand diese Verschränkung von theologischem und philosophischem Denken stets ihren exemplarischen Niederschlag. Dabei durchzog eine Reihe von Grundspannungen die ideengeschichtliche Entwicklung auch noch der Nz. Hierzu zählten (1) die Frage…
Date: 2019-11-19

Muslimische Gesellschaften

(7,078 words)

Author(s): Reichmuth, Stefan
1. Probleme der Wahrnehmung Ähnlich wie im christl. Europa standen G.-Formen und Kultur der Muslime in der Nz. in vielfacher Kontinuität zum MA; von zeitgenössischen europ. Reisenden und Beobachtern wurden sie meist nicht von denen älterer Perioden geschieden. Die wachsenden Kontakte der Europäer zu muslim. Regionen brachten es vielmehr mit sich, dass ihr Bild des Islam, das sich aus dem Austausch ergab, als quasi zeitloses Muster auch die gesamte islam. Vergangenheit einschloss. Noch bis zum Ende des 17. Jh.s konnte sich dem Reisenden in vielen mus…
Date: 2019-11-19

Kulturkontakt, globaler

(8,984 words)

Author(s): Rinke, Stefan | Falola, Toyin | Aderinto, Saheed | Reichmuth, Stefan | Liebau, Heike | Et al.
1. EinleitungLange Zeit meinte der Begriff K. das Zusammentreffen unterschiedlicher, in sich homogener und statischer kultureller Einheiten. Moderne Ansätze zum Verständnis von K. gehen demgegenüber von einem anderen Kulturbegriff aus. Demnach ist Kultur ein »selbstgesponnenes Bedeutungsgewebe« [3. 9] des menschlichen Bewusstseins, das sich in dynamischen Prozessen der Konstruktion von Symbolen permanent verändert. Die Deutungen erfolgen sowohl individuell als auch kollektiv und produzieren Bedeutungen und Identitäten. Diese Interp…
Date: 2019-11-19

Okkultismus

(2,076 words)

Author(s): Stengel, Friedemann | Reichmuth, Stefan
1. EuropaDer O. fand 1875 mit der Gründung der Theosophischen Gesellschaft durch Helena Petrovna Blavatsky und Henry Steel Olcott seine europ. institutionelle Gestalt (Theosophie). Zugleich wurde er hier in einer gegen den zeitgenössischen Materialismus und gegen die verfassten Kirchen gerichteten und sich als wiss. verstehenden Lehre ausgeformt, die eng mit der Esoterik des 19. Jh.s verbunden war. Kern dieser Lehre ist die Annahme immaterieller, übersinnlicher Kräfte, die von einem das gesamte (auch materielle) Universum durchdringenden »Fluidum«, »Astrallicht« bzw. …
Date: 2019-11-19

Mahdi-Bewegungen

(773 words)

Author(s): Reichmuth, Stefan
1. Frühislam»Der Rechtgeleitete« (arab. al-mahdī) ist im Islam ein Attribut für den Propheten und seine ersten Nachfolger, die Kalifen, deren »rechte Leitung« (arab. al-hudā) durch Gott unter den frühen Muslimen weithin anerkannt war. Dieser Konsens zerbrach in der rapiden Expansion des Kalifates und in den tiefen Interessenkonflikten, die mit dem Aufbau staatlicher Institutionen und mit der Verteilung der Einkünfte aus den Eroberungen verbunden waren. Sie führten vorübergehend zur Spaltung des Kalifates und zu zwei f…
Date: 2019-11-19

Moschee

(1,879 words)

Author(s): Reichmuth, Stefan | Gierlichs, Joachim
1. Geschichte und FunktionenDie M. (arab. masjid, »Ort der Niederwerfung zum Gebet«) [4] als Gebäude für das gemeinschaftliche Pflichtgebet, insbes. für das Freitagsgebet, entwickelte sich bereits seit dem frühen Islam zur zentralen religiösen und kommunalen Institution muslim. Gemeinschaften, die für eine Fülle kommunaler und politischer Funktionen genutzt wurde (u. a. politische Ansprachen, Bekanntmachungen und Beratungen, Rechtsprechung, Beherbergung von Fremden). Neben die große zentrale Freitags-M. (arab. jāmi‘) traten mit dem Wachstum muslim. Städte ei…
Date: 2019-11-19

Pilgerreise

(3,318 words)

Author(s): Herbers, Klaus | Reichmuth, Stefan
1. Europa 1.1. Begriff und ZweckDas lat. Wort peregrinatio (›Wanderung‹, ›Pilgerschaft‹) ist von per agrum (›über Land‹) abgeleitet. Damit verweist es v. a. auf den mühsamen Weg zu einem Ziel. Dieses konnte unterschiedlich definiert werden: Dank, Buße, Bitte, Suche nach relig. Gemeinschaft und weitere Heilserwartungen waren wohl die wichtigsten Motive. Dabei veränderte sich die in Antike und Spätantike noch dominierende Konzeption, das Leben selbst als Pilgerschaft zu einem höheren Ziel aufzufassen, zunehmend durch die Vorstellung, es sei dienlich, die Wirku…
Date: 2019-11-19

Nomaden

(3,683 words)

Author(s): Bley, Helmut | Nolte, Hans-Heinrich | Reichmuth, Stefan | Hölck, Lasse
1. ÜberblickIm Kontext der Weltgeschichte der Neuzeit und deren globaler Interaktionen ist auffallend, dass etwa ab dem 15. Jh. die Überlegenheit nomadischer (= nom.) und Vieh züchtender gegenüber bäuerlichen Gesellschaften nachließ. Die Stärke der N. hatte sich in Asien und Afrika aufgrund der militärischen Überlegenheit ihrer berittenen Heere entwickelt – meist in Kombination mit der Rekrutierung auch bäuerlich sesshafter Menschen [28], mit der Eroberung von Städten, der Übernahme von Verwaltungsstrukturen und der Sicherung großer überregionaler Hande…
Date: 2019-11-19
▲   Back to top   ▲