Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "d'Hubert, Thibaut" ) OR dc_contributor:( "d'Hubert, Thibaut" )' returned 7 results. Modify search

Did you mean: dc_creator:( "d'hubert, thibaut" ) OR dc_contributor:( "d'hubert, thibaut" )

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Dobhāshī

(984 words)

Author(s): d'Hubert, Thibaut
Dobhāshī denotes an idiom characteristic of a trend of Bengali Muslim literature that developed in the second half of the twelfth/eighteenth century and lasted until the first decades of the twentieth. Dobhāshī means literally “(made) of two languages,” referring to the composite nature of this literary idiom: this interpretation is privileged, but another one could be the language ‘of the interpreter’, or dobhāsh/dobhāshī—an Indic term also used in Persian and Western languages to designate native interpreters in South Asia (Hobson-Jobson, s.v. “Dubash, Dobash, Debash”). Dobhā…
Date: 2021-07-19

Bengali literature

(3,023 words)

Author(s): d'Hubert, Thibaut
Bengali literature developed in the northeastern part of the Indian subcontinent in about the eighth/fourteenth century, when Bengali, also called Bangla, became a literary language. After 739/1338 Bengal was an independent sultanate ruled by Turko-Afghan elites based in the urban centres. Starting from 983/1575 the region was then progressively integrated into the Mughal empire and was entirely conquered in 1010/1610. During the late Mughal period (12th/18th century) the province became virtually autonomous. Bengal came under British control during the second half of the 12th…
Date: 2021-07-19

Ālāol

(940 words)

Author(s): d'Hubert, Thibaut
Ālāol (ʿAlāwal in Arabic script, fl. 1061–82/1651–71), one of the most prolific authors of premodern Bengali literature, was born in central Bengal, in the Afghan chiefdom of Fatiḥābād, which became part of the Mughal empire in about 1019/1610. ʿAlāwal may be an abridged and corrupted form of a name such as ʿAlāʾ al-Dīn and it is commonly found among Afghans living in India during this period (d’Hubert, 288–90). After being captured by Luso-Arakanese raiders (Arakanese flotillas led by Portugues…
Date: 2021-07-19

Sayyid Sulṭān

(808 words)

Author(s): d'Hubert, Thibaut
Sayyid Sulṭān (fl. 1040–55/1630–45) was among the first Bengali Muslim authors to contribute to the spread of the teachings of Islam to the rural populations of eastern Bengal. He composed his epic Nabīvaṃsha (“The Prophet’s lineage”, composed c. 1040–55/1630–45) as a counter to the vernacular versions of Hindu epic poems that were then popular in the Muslim households of eastern Bengal. He was a Ṣūfī and a disciple of a certain Sayyid Ḥasan who came from Gaura, the centre of the regional power of the Bengal sultanate. Sayyid Sulṭān claims no affiliation with a particular Ṣūfī order ( ṭarīqa…
Date: 2021-07-19

ʿAbd al-Ḥakīm

(789 words)

Author(s): d'Hubert, Thibaut
ʿAbd al-Ḥakīm (c. 1008–80/1600–70) was born in the village of Bābūpūr, in the kingdom of Bhulua, in present-day southeastern Bangladesh. With Ālāol (fl. 1061–82/1651–71), he was one of the most prolific writers of premodern Bengali literature. We have little material with which to reconstruct his biography (Sultana, 20–50). He was a rural scholar versed in Persian literature, who translated several texts into Bengali. ʿAbd al-Ḥakīm’s oeuvre is a window on the religious life of eastern Bengal duri…
Date: 2021-07-19

Sylhet Nagari

(781 words)

Author(s): d'Hubert, Thibaut
Sylhet Nagari (Nāgarī) is a script used to write a form of the premodern Bengali literary idiom used in the Sylhet region of present-day northeastern Bangladesh. It is also known as Siletī Nāgarī, Jalālābādī Nāgarī, Phul Nāgarī, Musalmānī Nāgarī, and sometimes assimilated to Kaithī Nāgarī, the eastern form of “Bihari shorthand” it is ultimately derived from. The name Musalmanī Nāgarī highlights the communal nature of the use of this alphabet, which was transmitted mainly among the Muslim population of Sylhet. Its early history and the exact reasons for its regional spread a…
Date: 2021-07-19

Ḥayāt Maḥmūd

(724 words)

Author(s): d'Hubert, Thibaut
Ḥayāt Maḥmūd (fl. 1135–72/1723–59) was a Bengali author who worked as a judge (qāḍī) and lived his entire life in the region of Ghoraghat, in northwestern Bengal. The main events of his biography can be gathered from evidence in his texts, information handed down by his descendants, and a dubious biographical sketch written by two local scholars who lived in the first half of the twentieth century (Heyāt Māmud, 1–23). Ḥayāt Maḥmūd was the son of a certain Shāh Kabīr. The genealogy preserved by his descendants shows that he belonged to a family of judges ( qāḍīs), a profession that he himse…
Date: 2021-07-19