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Chloris

(193 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
(Χλωρίς, Χλῶρις; Chlōrís, Chlôris). [German version] [1] Goddess According to Ovid (Fast. 5,195ff.) the goddess  Flora was originally called C.; Zephyrus took her as his wife and made her goddess of flowers. This juxtaposition is an invention of Ovid. It was taken up by Lactantius (1,20,8) and by the Anthologia Latina (747R.). Bloch, René (Berne) [German version] [2] Daughter of Niobe, the only one spared by Artemis Daughter of  Amphion [1] and  Niobe. She was the only one of the daughters of Niobe to be spared by Artemis, because she prayed to Leto. Her image …

Byblis

(140 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Βυβλίς, Βιβλίς; Byblís, Biblís). Daughter of Miletus and Eidothea, the daughter of Eurytus, or of Cyane, the daughter of Maeander. Her passionate love for her twin brother  Caunus drives him into exile and herself into death. In respect of her end, the stories vary: she hangs herself (Parthenius 11; Conon 2), she jumps off a cliff and is transformed into a hamadryad by nymphs (Ant. Lib. 30 according to Nicander), or she dissolves into tears and becomes a spring (Ov. Met. 9,450-665). According to Steph. Byz. (s.v. B.), B. is the eponym of the Phoenician town of Byblus. Bloch, …

Educa

(107 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Edula, Edusa, Edulia). Roman ‘special deity’ ( Indigitamenta), which, according to Varro (antiquitates rerum divinarum 114 Cardauns) was named in Christian Polemic (Tert. Ad nat. 2,11,8: Edula; Aug. Civ. 4,34; 6,9) together with  Potina. According to Varro in Non. 151, E. ( Edusa) supposedly watched over the food for the children. Sacrifices were made to her when children had their first meal. In Donat. Ter. Phorm. 1,1,15, her name is Edulia. According to [1], E. was originally a gens deity. Bloch, René (Berne) Bibliography 1 F. Altheim, Röm. Religionsgesch. 1,…

Euterpe

(151 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Εὐτέρπη; Eutérpē; cf. τέρπειν; térpein, ‘giver of joy’). One of the nine  Muses, the daughter of Zeus and  Mnemosyne (Hes. Theog. 77; Apollod. 1,13; Orph. H. 76,8; schol. Apoll. Rhod. 3,1 b). Later texts describe flute playing as her particular responsibility (Hor. Carm. 1,1,33; schol. Eur. Rhes. 346; schol. Hes. Theog. 76). According to Apollodorus of Athens (FGrH 244 F 146) and Heraclid. fr. 159 Wehrli, E. was impregnated by Strymon and gave birth to  Rhesus (cf. Apollod. 1,18; sch…

Pygmies

(323 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Πυγμαῖοι/ Pygmaîoi; from πυγμή/ pygmḗ, 'fist'; hence 'mittens' [1]; Lat. Pygmaei). A dwarf people, generally located by ancient ethnography at the edge of the known world, i.e. in Africa (Aristot. Hist. an. 8,12,597a), India (Ctesias FGrH 688 F 45) and Thrace (Plin. HN 4,44). Pygmy is, however, also a general term for people of unusually short stature (Aristot. Gen. an. 2,8,749a 4-6). Mythology has pygmies originating from Gaea and Poseidon  (Hes. fr. 150,17-18 Merkelbach/West). Herodotus'…

Unicorn

(287 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (μονόκερως/ monókerōs, monoceros, unicornis). The unicorn was irrelevant to Graeco-Roman mythology; and it was not a theme in iconography (it is common, however, in mediaeval book illustration). Accounts of one-horned animals are more frequent, originating primarily from the Indian rhinoceros (Aristot. Hist. an. 2,1, 499b20; Aristot. Part. an. 3,2,663a20; Megasthenes FGrH 715 F 27b;  Ael. NA 3,41; 16,20; Plin. HN 8,76; 11,255). The main source was Ctesias of Cnidus, who was the first to describe in detail a fabulous one-horned wild ass in his Ἰνδικά ( Indiká = FGr…

Chryseis

(116 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Χρυσηίς; Chrysēís). Etymology ‘girl from  Chryse’ or ‘daughter of Chryses’. The daughter of the Apollo priest Chryses who was captured by  Achilles in Thebes and allotted to Agamemnon as a slave. When Chryses pleaded with Agamemnon to have C. returned, he was refused. On Chryses' prayer Apollo forced the return of C. by sending a plague. Agamemnon then demanded Achilles' captive  Briseis as a substitute and, thus, incurred his anger (Hom. Il. 1). According to schol. Il. 1,392 C. w…

Chrysippe

(23 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Χρυσίππη; Chrysíppē). Danaid who killed her spouse Chrysippus, son of Aegyptus (Apollod. 2,18; Hyg. Fab. 170). Bloch, René (Berne)

Deimos

(172 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Δεῖμος; Deîmos). Personification of fear; usually associated with  Phobos. Together with  Eris the pair urge warriors into battle (Hom. Il. 4,440), and harness the horses to  Ares's chariot (Il. 15,119f.).  Antimachus [3] misinterpreted them as the horses of Ares, descended from Thyella (‘storm’) [1]; similarly, in Val. Fl. 3,89 Terror and Pavor are the horses of Mars. According to Hes. Theog. 934, D. and Phobos are the sons of Ares and Cythereia (Aphrodite). In Semus, FGrH 396 F …

Concordia

(391 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] The personification and deification of harmony analogous to the Greek  Homonoia (Cic. Nat. D. 2,61; ThlL, Onom. 2, 555-558 s.v. C.). C. is attested on one of the pocula deorum ( Cucordia. pocolo) [1]. Worship of c. is attested in Rome from the 4th cent. BC. The decisive phases in her history are associated with the search for internal unity (cf. the concordia ordinum). A first temple was allegedly dedicated to her in the northwest corner of the Forum in 367 BC by  Camillus to celebrate the end of the ‘struggle of the orders’ (Plut. Camillus 4…

Candaules

(156 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Κανδαύλης; Kandaúlēs). According to Hdt. 1.7-12, the last ruler of the Heraclid dynasty in Lydian Sardis. The Greeks also called him Myrsilus after his father Myrsus. C. allowed his faithful retainer  Gyges [1] to see his wife naked so that he would be convinced of her beauty. He was then murdered by Gyges after C.'s wife confronted him with the choice of suicide as an alternative. A dramatic version of this material can be glimpsed from the remnants of the text (TrGF II Adespota …

Botres

(76 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Βότρης; Bótrēs). Son of the Theban Eumelus. When the latter, in B.'s presence, is about to sacrifice a sheep to Apollo, B. eats the animal's brains before it is placed on the altar. Thereupon his father strikes him with a firebrand. Apollo, however, takes pity on him and turns him into the bird, Aeropus (Bee-eater), which broods in an underground nest and continually seeks to fly (Ant. Lib. 18). Bloch, René (Berne)

Diores

(130 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
(Διώρης; Diṓrēs). [German version] [1] Son of Amarynceus Son of  Amarynceus [1]. One of the four leaders of the Epeians from Elis who went to Troy. He was killed by the Thracian Peirous (Hom. Il. 2,622; 4,517; Paus. 5,3,4). Bloch, René (Berne) Bibliography W. Kullmann, Die Quellen der Ilias, Hermes ES 14, 1960, 98 and 162 E. Visser, Homers Katalog der Schiffe, 1997, 569-573. [German version] [2] Father of Automedon Father of  Automedon, chariot driver to Achilles and Patroclus (Hom. Il. 17,429). Bloch, René (Berne) [German version] [3] Son of Priamus Son of Priamus, companion of  Ae…

Demodice

(111 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Δημοδίκη; Dēmodíkē). Second wife of the Boeotian king  Athamas and stepmother of Phrixus whom she pursues in unrequited love. Phrixus takes flight for this reason (Pind. fr. 49, Damodika; Schol. Pind. Pyth. 4,288a). Usually she is called  Ino (Apollod. 1,80-84). In another version she is the wife of Cretheus, brother of Athamas. She slanders Phrixus, who will not return her love, before Cretheus, whereupon he demands Phrixus' death from Athamas. However, Phrixus is removed by his mother  Nephele (Hyg. Poet. Astr. 2,20). Bloch, René (Berne) Bibliography P. Angeli B…

Euphrosyne

(61 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Εὐφροσύνη; Euphrosýne, ‘cheerfulness’). One of the  Charites (Hes. Theog. 909; Pind. Ol. 14,14; Apollod. 1,13). In Hyg. Poet. Fab. praef. E. is a daughter of Erebos and  Nyx (cf. Gratia in Cic. Nat. D. 3,44). In Orph. H. 3,5 E. is an epithet of Nyx. Bloch, René (Berne) Bibliography K.-H. Tomberg, E. B. Harrison, s.v. Charis, Charites, LIMC 3.1, 191-203.

Iapetus

(185 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Ἰαπετός; Iapetós). The etymology is uncertain, perhaps ‘the one hurled down’ (on ἰάπτειν; iáptein, ‘to hurl’ [1]). The often postulated connection to OT Japheth, the third son of Noah (Gen. 5,32 et passim), cannot be proven [2; 3]. I. is the titan who was hurled by Zeus into Tartarus along with  Kronos (Hom. Il. 8,479). Son of  Gaia and  Uranus (Hes. Theog. 134). He fathered the sons  Atlas [2],  Menoetius,  Prometheus and Epimetheus with the Oceanid Clymene (Hes. Theog. 507-511). Among others, Asia (Apollod. 1…

Doto

(66 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Δωτώ; Dōtṓ). Feminine short form, presumably understood as ‘the giver’ [1] (cf. δώτωρ, δωτήρ, δώτης etc.). One of the  Nereids (Hom. Il. 18,43; Hes. Theog. 248; Apollod. 1,11; Verg. Aen. 9,102; Hyg. Fab. praef. 8; IG XIV 2519). She occupied a sanctuary in the Syrian coastal town of Gabala (Paus. 2,1,8). Bloch, René (Berne) Bibliography 1 Kamptz, 126. G. Garbugino, s.v. D., EV 2, 137.

Deiopea

(54 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Δηιόπεια; Dēiópeia). A nymph in the vicinity of Cyrene, distinguished by her extraordinary beauty; she lives in the depths of the Peneius (Verg. G. 4,343). Juno promises her to Aeolus in marriage (Verg. Aen. 1,71-73). Bloch, René (Berne) Bibliography R. A. B. Mynors, Virgil. Georgics (comm.), 1990, 303 M. Scarsi, s.v. D., EV 2,17.

Brontes

(70 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Βρόντης; Bróntēs), cf. ἡ βροντή (hē brontḗ) ‘thunder’. One of the three  Cyclopes born of Uranus and Gaia, who gave Zeus thunder and lightning (Hes. Theog. 140; Apollod. 1,1; Serv. Aen. 8,425; Pherecydes in schol. Eur. Alc. 1). B. made  Metis pregnant, who was devoured by Zeus, whereupon Pallas  Athene sprang from Zeus' head (schol. Il. 8,39). Bloch, René (Berne) Bibliography O. Touchefeu-Meynier, s.v. Kyklops, LIMC 6.1, 154-159.

Dictys

(316 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
(Δίκτυς; Díktys). [German version] [1] Son of Magnes and a Naiad Son of Magnes and a Naiad, brother or half-brother to  Polydectes (Apollod. 1,88), the king of the island of Seriphos. Other sources stress his descent from Poseidon direct or in the fourth degree (Tzetz. Lycoph. 838; Pherecydes FGrH 3 F 10f.). As a fisherman (D. = ‘netsman’) he lodges  Danae and her infant son  Perseus, who are swept onto the shore at Seriphos in a box. The story has been frequently staged [1]. In Aeschylus' satyr-play Diktyulkoi (TrGF 3 F 46-47) satyrs help D. and another fisherman to land the heav…
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