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Cillas

(72 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Κίλλας; Kíllas, also Kíllos, Κίλλος). C., who according to the Troezenian legend is called Sphaerus, is the charioteer of  Pelops (Paus. 5,10,7; schol. Eur. Or. 990). On the way to a chariot race with Oenomaus, Cillas falls into the sea at Lesbos and drowns. Pelops erects a memorial to him, a temple of Apollo Killaios and founds the town of Cilla (Theopompus 339 FHG 1). Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Lycabas

(199 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
(Λυκάβας; Lykábas). [German version] [1] One of the Tyrrhenian pirates One of the Tyrrhenian pirates, exiled for murder. The pirates promise the boy Dionysus to take him to the island of Naxos, but intend to abduct him. Their leader Acoetes [1] refuses to support the plan because he recognizes a god in the boy, but L. strikes him down. For their heinous deeds, Dionysus transforms the whole crew into dolphins, apart from Acoetes, whom he spares (Ov. Met. 3,623ff.; Hyg. Fab. 134). Frey, Alexandra (Basle) [German version] [2] On of the Centaurs One of the Centaurs who sexually assault th…

Clytius

(135 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
(Κλυτίος, Κλύτιος; Klytíos, Klýtios). [German version] [1] Giant Giant, who was killed either by Hecate with flaming torches or by Hephaestus with red-hot irons (Apollod. 1,37). Frey, Alexandra (Basle) [German version] [2] Son of Alcmaeon and Arsinoe [I 3] Son of Alcmaeon and  Arsinoe [I 3]; grandson of Amphiaraus (Apollod. 3,87; Paus. 6,17,6). The soothsaying family of the  Clyti(a)dae in Elis can be traced back to C. (Cic. Div. 1,91). Frey, Alexandra (Basle) [German version] [3] Argonaut Argonaut, son of Eurytus of Oechalia (Apoll. Rhod. 1,86; 2,1043). C. was killed b…

Norax

(44 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Νῶραξ/ Nôrax). Son of Hermes and Erytheia, daughter of Geryoneus. According to legend, N. led the Iberians out of Spanish Tartessus to Sardinia, and founded the first town there, which was named Nora [1] after him (Paus. 10,17,5). Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Ogygus/Ogyges

(158 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Ὤγυγος; Ṓgygos/Ὠγύγης; Ōgýgēs). The name O. is probably pre-Greek, and may derive from the Lydian-Carian migrations; at that time, O. was worshipped as a god. The Boeotian goddesses of oaths, the Praxidikai, were said to be his daughters (Paus. 9,33,5; Suda s.v. Πραξιδίκη; Steph. Byz. s.v. Τρεμίλη). Ancient king of Boeotia (the adjective ὠγύγιος/ ōgýgios is used for 'Boeotian' and 'ancient': Suda s.v. Ὠγύγια κακά; Ὠγύγιον); autochthon and king of the Ectenians (Paus. 9,5,1); son of Boeotus (schol. Eur. Phoen. 1113) and husband of Th…

Caphene

(58 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Καφένη; Kaphénē). Carian maiden, who, out of love for the Melian Nymphius betrays her people by divulging their plan to invite the Melians to a feast so as to kill them underhandedly. Instead, the Carians were slain. In return, C. becomes the wife of Nymphius (Plut. Mor. 246d-247a, 207f.; Polyaen. 8,46). Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Megapenthes

(223 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
(Μεγαπένθης/ Megapénthēs, ‘very sorrowful’). [German version] [1] Son of King Proetus of Argos Son of King Proetus of Argos (Apollod. 2,29), father of Argeus and grandfather of Anaxagoras (Paus. 2,18,4) or father of Anaxagoras and Iphianira (Diod. Sic. 4,68,4; cf. also Iphianassa [1]). M. exchanged kingdoms with Perseus, so that he ruled over Argos and Perseus over Tiryns. According to Hyginus (Hyg. Fab. 244), he was said to have killed Perseus for the murder of his father. Frey, Alexandra (Basle) [German version] [2] Son of Menelaus [1] and a slave woman Son of Menelaus [1] and a sla…

Lelante

(51 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Ληλάντη; Lēlántē). Wife of the mythological Molossian king Munichus and mother of Alcander among others. When the god-fearing family is attacked by robbers and their house is set alight, they are transformed into birds by Zeus so they can be saved (Antoninus Liberalis 14). Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Laogoras

(63 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Λαογόρας; Laogóras). Dryopian king who by holding a banquet in the manner of his people in the grove of Apollo offends against the god. L. supports the Lapith prince Coronus in his attack on the Dorian king Aegimius [1]. The latter calls Hercules for help, who then kills L. and Coronus (Apollod. 2,154f.; Diod. Sic. 4,37,3). Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Meles

(144 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Μέλης/ Mélēs, also Μέλητος/ Melētos). Athenian who, not returning the love of the metic Timagoras, drives him to suicide; after the latter's death, M. follows suit out of remorse: aition for the altar of Anterus, which the metoikoi erected in the city and venerated in memory of Anterus' having avenged Timagoras (Paus. 1,30,1). There is a similar story in Aelianus (fr. 72 Domingo-Forasté = Suda s.v. Μέλητος μ 497): M. and Timagoras are both Athenian citizens of noble family. M., who i…

Cerebia

(50 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Κηρεβία; Kērebía). Wife of Poseidon, mother of  Dictys [1] and  Polydectes, who rules over the Cycladean island of Seriphus (schol. Lycoph. 838). But according to Hesiod (fr. 6 Rzach) and Apollodorus (1,88), Magnes and a Naead are the parents of both of them. Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Peithagoras

(81 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Πειθαγόρας; Peithagóras). Soothsayer of Amphipolis (inspecting the entrails of sacrificed animals), brother of Apollodorus, one of the hetaíroi of Alexander [4] the Great; in 323 BC P. foretold the impending death of Hephaestion [1] (Arr. Anab. 7,18; App. Civ. 2,152) and later also that of Alexander (Arr. l.c.; App. l.c.). Alexander received this news from P.'s brother and praised both of them (Arr. l.c.). P. was obviously Aristobulus' [7] direct source (Arr. Anab. 7,18,5). Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Calydnus

(64 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Κάλυδνος; Kálydnos). Son of  Uranus, architect and first king of Thebes ( Thebae) which he fortifies with a wall. The city is therefore also called Kálydna or Kalýdnou týrsis, ‘fortress of C.’ (Steph. Byz. in schol. Lycophron 1209). The incorrect translation of C. as ‘good singer’ was linked with the building of the wall around Thebes through music. Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Cytissorus

(90 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Κυτί(σ)σωρος; Kytí(s)sōros). C.'s parents are  Phrixus and Chalciope [2], a daughter of  Aeetes; grandson of  Athamas, king of the Minyae (Apoll. Rhod. 2,1148ff.; schol. Apoll. Rhod. 2,388; Apollod. 1,83), whom he rescues from being sacrificed when he returns from Aeetes to his homeland, Thessalian Achaea. Athamas was to have been sacrificed to  Zeus Laphystios as an act of atonement. C. having rescued his grandfather, the curse remains on his descendants (Hdt. 7,197). In Sophocles (schol. Aristoph. Nub. 257) it is Heracles who rescues Athamas. Frey, Alexandra …

Marmax

(45 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Μάρμαξ; Mármax). Suitor of Hippodamia [1], and the first to be killed by Oenomaus (Hes. fr. 259a). His horses Parthenia and Eripha are buried together with M. M. was also called Mermnes (schol. Pind. O. 1,127b) or Mermnon. Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Lamache

(41 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Λαμάχη; Lamáchē). Lemnian woman who conceives Leucophanes with the Argonaut Euphemus. From Leucophanes is descended Battus [1], who founds the city of Cyrene (schol. Pind. Pyth. 455b; [1]). Frey, Alexandra (Basle) Bibliography 1 L. Malten, Kyrene, 1911, 192.

Oeagrus

(86 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Οἴαγρος/ Oíagros). Father of the singer Orpheus (Pind. fr. 128c,11f.; Pl. Symp. 179d; Diod. Sic. 3,65,6; 4,25,2 etc.). The Muse Calliope [1] is usually said to be the mother of Orpheus (Apollod. 1,14; Apoll. Rhod. 1,23ff. with schol.); variants are Polyhymnia (schol. Apoll. Rhod. l.c.) and Cleio. O's homeland was Thracia, where Orpheus has also been localized. The parents of O. were Methone and Pierus (Charax FHG 3 fr. 20) or Charops [2], to whom Dionysus gave Thracia (Diod. 3,65). Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Loxias

(117 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Λοξίας; Loxías). Epiclesis of the god Apollo (Pind. Pyth. 3,28; Pind. Isthm. 7,49; Hdt. 1,91; 4,163; Aesch. Sept. 618; Soph. OT 853). It is striking that the combination Apollo L. does not occur; the reference to Apollo as a Delphian oracle god, however, is clear (cf. l.c.). If the name L. is derived from loxós ‘bent’, ‘crooked’, then it refers to Apollo's dark and confusing oracles (Lucian. Iupp. trag. 28; Plut. Mor. 511b). According to the schol. to Callimachus, Apollo is named L. because he is said to have been brought up by Lox…

Pelanos

(150 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (πελανός; pelanós), a more or less liquid gruel or dough, which could also contain honey, oil, poppies, milk or wine, was thrown in the fire as a sacrificial offering and burnt or poured out (cf. Aesch. Pers. 203f.; Eur. Ion 226f.; 705-707). According to Theophrastus (in Porph. De abstinentia 2,29) pelanos assumed increasingly refined forms in the course of its historical development. The dough was finally mixed and baked into flat bread, cakes or pancakes. P elanos itself, however, was never eaten. It was particularly common as a sacrificial offering  in…

Lacinius

(129 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Λακίνιος, Λακῖνος; Lakínios, Lakînos). Iapygian king who ruled over the land of the Bruttii; eponym of the Lacinium Mountains near Croton. L. took in Croton, who had been banished from Corcyra, and gave him his daughter Laure (or Laurete) in marriage (schol. Lycoph. 1007; schol. Theoc. 4,33b). When Heracles [1] returned from his Geryon adventure, he came into conflict with L. Concerning the cause of this, there are two variant accounts: either L. refused hospitality to Heracles, c…
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