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ḠANI KAŠMIRI

(2,333 words)

Author(s): Prashant Keshavmurthy
Pen name of Mollā MOḤAMMAD-ṬĀHER KAŠMĪRĪ (1630-69). He practiced the “Speaking Anew” ( tāza-guʾyi) stylistics of the ḡazal that had arisen across the Persian world in the early 1500s. ḠANI , MOLLĀ TĀHER KAŠMIRI (d. 1079/1668-9): the most famous Persian-language poet of the region of Kashmir in South Asia. He practiced the “Speaking Anew” (tāza-guʾyi) stylistics of the ḡazal that had arisen across the Persian world in the early 1500s. In its intricate deployment of kinds of syllepsis, paronomasia, oronym and amphiboly—collectively termed ihām—whose non-salient ( baʿid) meaning or …
Date: 2013-10-21

RĀM WA SITĀ

(2,078 words)

Author(s): Prashant Keshavmurthy
an early 17th-century Persian translation of an ancient Indian love story epic in Vālmiki’s Sanskrit Rāmāya a that narrates the earthly career of Rām, an incarnation of the god Vishnu, and his wife Sitā. It was translated in the maṯnawi genre by Masiḥ Saʿd-Allāh Pānipati. RĀM WA SITĀ, an early 17th-century Persian translation of an ancient Indian love story epic in Vālmiki’s Sanskrit Rāmāya a (ca. the 2nd cent. BCE) that narrates the earthly career of Rām (Skr. Rāma), an incarnation of the god Vishnu, and his wife Sitā. It was translated in the maṯnawi genre by Masiḥ Saʿd-Allāh Pānipat…
Date: 2015-09-18

Ḵān-e Ārezu, Serāj-al-din ʿAli (ARTICLE 2)

(5,155 words)

Author(s): Prashant Keshavmurthy
(1688-1756), a Persian-language philologist, lexicographer, literary critic and poet from North India. ḴĀN-E ĀREZU, SERĀJ-AL-DIN ʿALI (1688-1756), a Persian-language philologist, lexicographer, literary critic and poet from North India. In defending a Persian ḡazal stylistics that originated in the 1500s called “Speaking Anew” ( tāza-guyʾi) against detractors, he sought to demonstrate that the trans-temporal and trans-spatial concept and criterion of “linguistic purity” ( faṣāḥat) had always had local content specific to pedagogically trained peoples withi…
Date: 2016-05-02