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Locrus

(192 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
(Λοκρός; Lokrós). [German version] [1] Mythical ancestor of the Locrian tribe Mythical ancestor ( ktístēs) of the Locrian tribe, son of Physcus (Hdn. 2,947), grandson of Amphictyon [2] (the oldest sacred site of the Delphian Amphiktyonia was located in Anthela/East Locris). Cabye or Protogeneia (schol. Pind. Ol. 9,86) is his wife. The Leleges, who were led by L. (Hes. fr. 234,1 M.-W.), named themselves Locrians after him (Str. 7,7,2). Zingg, Reto (Basle) [German version] [2] Son of Zeus Son of Zeus and the Argive king's daughter Maera, helps Amphion [1] and Zethus buil…

Corythus

(196 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
(Κόρυθος, Kórythos). [German version] [1] Epiclesis of Apollo  Epiclesis of Apollo, see Kory(n)thos. Zingg, Reto (Basle) [German version] [2] Eponym of the Corytheís deme in Tegea  Eponym of the Corytheís deme in Tegea (Paus. 8,45,1). Zingg, Reto (Basle) [German version] [3] Tyrrhenian king Son of Zeus and  Electra [3], the daughter of Atlas. Tyrrhenian king. Founder of C. (or Cortona or Cora: Plin. HN 3,5,63), an Etruscan city (Sil. Pun. 4,720), which was also identified with Tarquinii [1], Lat. Corythus. The Italic version of the myth …

Iodama

(65 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] (Ἰοδάμα; Iodáma). Local deity of Coronea (Boeotia), driven out by Athena. In mythology the daughter of  Itonus, granddaughter of  Amphictyon [2], priestess of Athena Itonia, who turned her to stone with the Gorgoneion (Paus. 9,34,2); in a different tradition mother of Thebe by Zeus, sister of Athena, killed by her out of jealousy (Simonides, FGrH 8 F 1). Zingg, Reto (Basle)

Crotopus

(85 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] (Κρότωπος; Krótōpos). King of Argos (cf.  Coroebus [1]), son of Agenor, father of Sthenelas and Psamathe (Paus. 2,16,1). C.'s grave lay in Argos, where later on a temple of Dionysus was erected (Paus. 2,37,7). After killing Python, Apollo visits C. in expiation (Stat. Theb. 1,570). Psamathe bears the god a son,  Linus. C. condemns her to death when he learns of her relationship with Apollo. The latter punishes Argos with a plague (Conon, FGrH 26 F 1 19). Zingg, Reto (Basle)

Iobates

(76 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] (Ἰοβάτης/ Iobátēs, ‘who strides along powerfully’). King of Lycia (anonymous in Hom. Il. 6,174-177), to whom Proetus sends  Bellerophontes with the ‘Uriah letter’ (Apollod. 2,30ff.; Hyg. Fab. 57; cf. Plut. Mor. 248a-d). Father of  Stheneboea and Philonoe. An homonymous tragedy by Sophocles has been transmitted in fragmentary form (TrGF IV 297-299); Euripides wrote a Stheneboea (TGF p.567). Zingg, Reto (Basle) Bibliography T. R. Bryce, The Lycians in Literary and Epigraphic Sources I, 1986, 16-20; 209.

Cabye, Cambyse

(122 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] (Καβύη, Καμβύση; Kabýē, Kambýsē). Heroine. Daughter of the Epean Opus in Elis. In order to link the Locrian royal genealogy with the Epean, Pindar has Zeus kidnap the daughter of Opus from Elis, father a son with her in Arcadia, and then bring him to the childless king  Locrus as an adoptive son (Pind. Ol. 9,57; cf. also Diod. Sic. 14,17). According to Aristotle in the Opountíōn politeía, Opus' daughter is called Cambyse (schol. Pind. Ol. 9,86 = Aristot. fr. 561 Rose). Since Plutarch, who referred to her as Cabye, also drew from Aristotle (Plut. …

Hyrnetho

(47 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] (Ὑρνηθώ; Hyrnēthṓ). Eponym of the Argive phyle Hyrnathioi; sanctuaries in Argus and Epidaurus. Daughter of  Temenus and wife of the Heraclid  Deiphontes. H. was killed by her brothers because she took her husband's side in a family quarrel (Paus. 2,28,3-7). Zingg, Reto (Basle)

Crocon

(121 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] (Κρόκων). Mythical king who ruled in the border area of Eleusis and Athens (Paus. 1,38,2). He was married to Saisara, a daughter of  Celeus. According to the Eleusian myth he was a son of  Triptolemus. Triptolemus was usually considered a son of Celeus and Metaneira (cf. Apollod. 3,102). The eponymous hero was accepted into the sacred Eleusian family. The name C. is derived from the cultic action of the κροκοῦν/ krokoûn, laying of wool threads into the right hand and on the left foot of the mystes. The family of the Croconides built a sanctuary of  Hestia in the 4t…

Lampas

(64 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] (Λα[μ]πάς/ La[m]pás, ‘torch’) is documented as the name of a maenad in a vase inscription, as the name of a hetaera (Ath. 13,583e), and the name of one of the five dogs of Daphnis who perish over his grave (Ael. NA 11,13; cf. schol. Theoc. 1,65); L. can also be a person's name [1]. Zingg, Reto (Basle) Bibliography 1 Bechtel, HPN, 604f.

Hyrie

(84 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] (Ὑρίη; Hyríē). Aetolian nymph. After her son Cycnus' leap from the cliff, she dissolves into tears with grief and becomes the lake that is named after her (Ov. Met. 7,371ff.). At Antoninus Liberalis 12 she is called (according to Nicander and Areus of Laconia) Thyria; when Cycnus, her and Apollo's son, throws himself into the Lake of Canope, she follows him; Apollo transforms both of them into swans. Zingg, Reto (Basle) Bibliography F. Bömer, P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphosen, B. VI-VII, 1976, 292.

Cranaus

(134 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] (Κραναός; Kranaós). Attic hero; also, the personification of Attica's rough and rocky ground. C. ruled during the time of the Deucalionic flood ( Deucalion). His wife was Pedias (= ‘plains’) of Lacedaemon (Marmor Parium, FGrH 239 A 4) [1]. In the myth, he has three daughters: Cranae, Cranaichme and Atthis (Apollod. 3,186). C. functions as arbitrator in the conflict between Athena and Poseidon (Apollod. 3,179). Pindar refers to Athens as Cranaaí (Pind. Ol. 13,38), Attica's inhabitants called themselves Cranaoí (Hdt. 8,44). C. is forced by  Amphictyon [1] to…

Caliadne

(21 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] (Καλιάδνη, Καλιάνδη; Kaliádnē, Kaliándē). Naiad, mother of twelve sons fathered by Aegyptus (Apollod. 2.19). Zingg, Reto (Basle)

Car

(78 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
(Κάρ; Kár). [German version] [1] Son of Phoroneus Eponym of the fortress of Megara (originally Caria) (Paus. 1,39,5), son of  Phoroneus; founder of the Demeter Temple. Zingg, Reto (Basle) [German version] [2] Son of Zeus and Crete Eponym of  Carians in Asia Minor; brother of Lydus and Mysus (Hdt. 1,171; Str. 14,659). Son of Zeus and Crete (Ael. NA 12,30); founder of the city of  Alabanda, buried in Euangela (Steph. Byz. s.v. K.). Zingg, Reto (Basle)

Korythale

(116 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] (κορυθάλη, κορυθαλίς; korythálē, korythalís, ‘leafy twig’ [1]). Doric variant type of the Eiresione (Hsch. s.v. Κορυθαλία). Korythale is a fertility twig from the olive tree or laurel (Plut. Theseus 18), a harvest fetish or fertility fetish [2], which was placed in front of the door at ephebic festivals and weddings (EM 531,53). At the festival of Tithenidia (= ‘wet-nurse festival’), which was celebrated with obscene dances performed by disguised actors [3], the korythale was presented to the goddess of fertility and wet-nurses, Artemis Korythalia (Hs…

Iapis

(69 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] Son of  Iasus and favourite of Apollo. The god wants to grant him the gift of prophecy, of playing the lyre and of accurate archery, but I. asks him for the art of healing instead so that he can save his father's life. With the help of Venus, he heals Aeneas' wounds (Verg. Aen. 12,391ff.; Serv. Aen. 12,391 (Iapyx); Macrob. Sat. 5,15,12). Zingg, Reto (Basle)

Hylaeus

(51 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] (Ὑλαῖος/ Hylaîos, ‘Man of the woods’).  Centaur, depicted in battle against the Lapiths (Verg. G. 2,457) on the François Vase (6th cent. BC); slain by Theseus (Serv. Aen. 8,294), Hercules (Hor. Carm. 2,12,6) or  Atalante (Apollod. 3,106; Callim. H. 3,221), whom he pursued together with Rhoeicus. Zingg, Reto (Basle)

Labdacus

(115 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] (Λάβδακος; Lábdakos). Son of the Theban king Polydorus and Nicteis. Link in the line of descent from Cadmus, the father of Polydorus, to Laius, the father of Oedipus. He is supposed to have waged a border war against Pandion and was punished with death for scorning Dionysus (Hdt. 5,59; Eur. Phoen. 8; Apollod. 3,40; 193; Paus. 9,5,5). He neither had a cult nor a known relationship to a particular place. In popular etymology, L. was known as ‘the limper’, based on the shape of the letter la(m)bda with its one shorter leg. This is Oedipus projected onto his ancestor [1]. Zingg, Ret…

Intarabus

(54 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] (Entarabus). Celtic deity only attested in inscriptions (CIL VIII, 3632, 4128), worshipped in the territory of the Treveri (Trier, Germany). The inscriptions speak of buildings dedicated to Intarabus ( porticus, aedes, fanum, simulacrum), which indicates the deity's popularity. In CIL VIII, 3653 I. is given the epithet Mars. Zingg, Reto (Basle)

Immaradus

(56 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] (Ἰμμάραδος/ Immárados, Ἴσμαρος/ Ísmaros). Eleusinian, son of  Eumolpus. Either alone or alongside his father, I. leads a Thracian army against the Athenians only to be killed in this ‘Eleusinian War’ by  Erechtheus (Apollod. 3,202). The duel was represented in a bronze group by  Myron on the Acropolis of Athens (Paus. 1,5,2). Zingg, Reto (Basle)

Ianira

(28 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] (Ἰάνειρα; Iáneira, ‘virility’).  Nereid (Hom. Il. 18,47; Apollod. 1,12) or  Oceanid (Hes. Theog. 356), one of Persephone's playmates (H. Hom. 2,421). Zingg, Reto (Basle)
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