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Noviomagus

(1,862 words)

Author(s): Schön, Franz (Regensburg) | Lafond, Yves (Bochum) | Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück) | Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] [1] City of the Bituriges Vivisci in Aquitania The city of the Bituriges Vivisci (Βίτουργες Οὐβίσκοι/ Bítourges Oubískoi) in Aquitania mentioned in Ptol. 2,7,7 (Νουιόμαγος/ Nouiómagos) is generally identified with a Roman vicus near Brion (Saint-Germain-d'Esteuil) in the Médoc between Lesparre and Pauillac ( département of Gironde). This town with an ancient sanctuary of the Medulli had been inhabited from the 3rd cent. BC; urban development is recognisable from the time of Claudius (41-54 AD). It was in this period that the fanum (sanctuary) and the theatre we…

Lexovii

(77 words)

Author(s): Lafond, Yves (Bochum)
[German version] Tribe on the western bank of the lower Sequana in the Gallia Celtica, later in the Gallia Lugdunensis. In Caesar's time they were part of the civitates Aremoricae. Main settlement: Noviomagus, modern Lisieux. Attestation: Caes. B Gall. 3,9; 7,75; Str. 4,1,14; 3,5; Plin. HN 4,107; Ptol. 2,8,2; 5. Inscr.: CIL III 3177-3182. Lafond, Yves (Bochum) Bibliography C. Lemaitre, Noviomagus Lexoviorum, in: R. Bedon (ed.), Les villes de la Gaule lyonnaise (Caesarodunum 30), 1996, 133-166.

Regni

(116 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] (Regini). Celtic tribe, who settled in the area of Hampshire and West Sussex and was part of the Kingdom of Commius (mid 1st cent. BC) and of Cogidubnus (one cent. later). The main city was Noviomagus (present-day Chichester), home to a temple of Neptune and Minerva in the 1st cent. AD [1. 91]. Located near Noviomagus and 1,6 km west of Chichester was the estate of Fishbourne, probably a governor's residence from the Flavian Period (columns, mosaics, wall paintings) [2]. Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) Bibliography 1 R. G. Collingwood, R. P. Wright, The Roman Inscriptions of…

Tricastini

(107 words)

Author(s): Polfer, Michel (Ettelbrück)
[German version] Celtic people in the Roman province of Narbonensis on the west bank of the Rhodanus (modern Rhône) in the mountainous country between the Cavari, the Vocontii and the Segovellauni (Liv. 5,34,5; 21,31,9; Sil. Pun. 3,466; Amm. Marc. 15,10,11). Ptol. 2,10,13 mentions Noviomagus [2] as main town of their civitas. Identification with modern Saint Paul Trois-Châteaux is likely; Augusta Tricastinorum at the time of Augustus, mentioned in Plin. HN 3,36 among the oppida Latina of the Narbonensis; Colonia Flavia Tricastinorum in the Flavian period (AE 1962, 143). Polfer, …

Laur(i)um

(131 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] Station in the territory of the Batavi (Tab. Peut. 2,3) on one of two roads between Ulpia Noviomagus and Lugdunum Batavorum (modern Katwijk), modern Woerden. Roman finds from about 50 to the 3rd cent. AD, a fort only from the Flavian period onwards (AD 69-96). Initially garrison of the cohors XV voluntariorum, after the middle of the 2nd cent. AD of the cohors III Breucorum. Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück) Bibliography H. Schönberger, Die röm. Truppenlager der frühen und mittleren Kaiserzeit zw. Nordsee und Inn, in: BRGK 66, 1985, 439 B 6 J. K. Haalebos, Ausgrabungen in Woer…

Icorigium

(159 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Batavian Revolt Roman road-station (It. Ant. 373,1: Egorigio; Tab. Peut. 3,1) where the Trier - Cologne road crossed the Kyll, modern Jünkerath. From the 1st cent. AD long-houses were built close to each other on both sides of the road, with the narrow side facing the street. Destroyed during the German invasions of the 3rd cent., protected in the late Constantinian period by a circular fortification (135 m diameter) with 13 round towers and two gateh…

Tabernae

(247 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] [1] Township in the territory of the Nemetes Township in the territory of the Nemetes on the Roman road on the west bank of the Rhenus [2] (It. Ant. 355; Amm. 16,2,12; Not. Dign. Occ. 41,16; Tab. Peut. 3,3), modern Rheinzabern. There is evidence  of brickworks of the legions of upper Germania from about AD 45 until c. AD 80; a fort, however, is not certain. After the withdrawal of the military brickworks, everyday and fine ceramics were made there for civilian needs. In about the middle of the 2nd cent. AD, a factory was developed for t…

Vertragus

(188 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] (οὐέρτραγος/ o uértragos). Greyhound, which is particularly prized for hare coursing because of its speed; the Latin name vertragus is derived from a Celtic word. The accurate description in Arr. Cyn. 3-6 of a powerful but slim dog with pointed muzzle and long ears enabled [1] to identify ancient depictions of vertragi. When hunting, the dogs which were kept in large compounds were led on leashes by slaves and released only when the prey had been flushed out and was in view. Hunters used to accompany them on horseback. Usually two vertragi were set on each hare, which t…

Batavi

(247 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] German breakaway tribe from the  Chatti, tracing its origins back to Mannus (Germanic deity); between 55 and 12 BC, they migrated into that part of the Rhine delta which had formerly been occupied by the Menapii. Their main settlement area was the Insula Batavorum, formed by the Oude Rijn and the Waal/Maas, cf. the modern Betuwe. Capitals of the B. were Batavodurum, and, from the time of Trajan, Ulpia  Noviomagus Batavorum. They were called ‘B., because they were the most able of horsemen’ (Cass. Dio 55,24); etymologically thus related to the Gothic batiza ‘better’. Impo…

Nemetes

(311 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] (Νέμητες; Némētes). Germanic tribe, which - judging by the Celtic name - probably settled  in the area of contact between Celts and Germani before the Roman period, but is hardly likely to belong to the Suebi. The N. were first mentioned alongside Triboci and Vangiones and later were also repeatedly referred to in conjunction with them (Plin. HN. 4,106; Tac. Germ. 28,4; Ptol. 2,9,17), among the seven tribes which Ariovistus had led across the Rhine (Caes. B Gall. 1,51,2). However, …

Macrinius

(384 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne) | Franke, Thomas (Bochum)
[German version] [1] M. M. Avitus Catonius Vindex Cos. suff. c. AD 175 Son of M. [4]. Began his career as an equestrian with the quattuor militiae, receiving the dona militaria from Marcus [2] Aurelius in AD 169. Procurator of Dacia Malvensis. Entered the Senate, legate of Moesia superior, perhaps as praetorian; suffect consul probably in 175; consular governor of Moesia inferior before the year 177. Died at the age of 42, probably during his governorship of Moesia inferior (CIL VI 1449 = ILS 1107). PIR2 M 22. Eck, Werner (Cologne) [German version] [2] C. M. Decianus Governor of Numidia…

Samarobriva

(526 words)

Author(s): Schön, Franz (Regensburg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: | Gallia/Gaul Principal town of the civitas of the Ambiani, Late Antique Ambianis, modern Amiens (Dépt. Somme) at a crossing ( -briva) over the Samara (Caes. B Gall. 5,24,1; 47,2; 53,3; Cic. Fam. 7,11,2; 12,1,16; Tab. Peut. 2,3; CIL XIII 3490; Notae Tironianae 73 Zangenmeister; Honorius, Cosmographia 36 B1 Riese; in Ptol. 2,9,4 alternatively: Σαμαρόβριγα/ Samaróbriga; ILS 5839; It. Ant. 379,9 f.; 380,1: Samarabriva). No evidence of a preceding Celtic settlement has been found [1]. Its geographical charact…

Viromandui

(555 words)

Author(s): Schön, Franz (Regensburg)
[German version] A people of Gallia Belgica, Northern France, settled in the region of Picardie on the so-called 'sill of Vermandois', on the upper courses of the Samara (the modern Somme) and Isar(a) [2] (the modern Oise; Liv. Per. 104; Plin. HN 106; Ptol. 2,9,11; Oros. 6,7). In part surrounded by dense forests, the V. had as neighbours to the north and north-east the Nervii and Atrebates [1], to the west the Ambiani and Bellovaci, and to the south the Suessiones. During Caesar’s Gallic War, they…

Treveri

(1,654 words)

Author(s): Schön, Franz (Regensburg)
[German version] I. Geography A tribe living in Gallia Belgica between the Meuse in the west and the Middle Rhine in the east, their territory bordered in the north by the Ardennes, the Luxembourg Eisling and the Middle Eifel; the southern boundary ran along the southern edge of Belgian Lorraine and Luxembourg, through the north of the Saarland and along the Nahe. Between the mountainous, densely wooded and rather settlement-hostile border areas in both north and south (Hunsrück) lay fertile hilly terrain, river valleys and bays with ideal conditions for settlement. Schön, Franz (Rege…

Legio

(5,549 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] A. Republic In early times, the Roman military contingent probably consisted of 3,000 soldiers in total, each of the three tribus of the royal era providing 1,000 men (Varro, Ling. 5,89) - a military force described as ‘the levy’ ( legio). The division of the Roman people into six classes of wealth, ascribed by historiographical tradition to Servius Tullius (Liv. 1,42,4-43,13; Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 4,15-18) also had a military purpose: a citizen's assets dictated with which weapons he was to equip himself. Those without property ( capite censi) were excluded from mili…

Netherlands and Belgium

(37,064 words)

Author(s): Heesakkers, C. L. | Tournoy, G. | Sacré, Dirk | Moormann, Eric M. | Paardt, R.th. Van Der | Et al.
Heesakkers, C. L. Tournoy, G. I. The Low Countries to 1575 (CT) [German version] A. The Territory and Academic Landscape (CT) The territory of the present-day Benelux states only began to form a certain geographical, political and cultural unit under the Dukes of Burgundy in the 14th cent. Philip the Bold, son of the French king and since 1363 Duke of Burgundy, married the heiress of Flanders in 1369. His grandson Philip the …

United Kingdom

(35,351 words)

Author(s): Busse, Wilhelm | Baumann, Uwe (Bonn RWG) | Kuhn-Chen, Barbara (Gießen RWG)
Busse, Wilhelm I. Middle Ages (CT) [German version] A. Introduction (CT) Collective memory of the end of Roman rule in Britain clearly became associated early on with a myth in Anglo-Saxon England: "This year [AD 418] the Romans collected all the hoards of gold that were in Britain; and some they hid in the earth, so that no man afterwards might find them, and some they carried away with them into Gaul" ( Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, sub anno 418). To the Anglo-Saxon mind, burying treasure was equivalent to relinquishing power. The Roman renunciation of rule thus became the …