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Mysia

(1,154 words)

Author(s): Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster)
(Μυσία/ Mýsía). [German version] A. Geography and ethnography Region in the northwest of Asia Minor, named after the Thracian tribe of the Mysi, which had probably migrated there by the 12th cent. BC. Their precise origin is unknown, but like the Phryges they may have migrated from the area of the lower Danube. If we may equate the Thracian Mysi with the later Moesi, then the site of their original settlement can be located south of the Danube in the area of northern Thrace (only in Hdt. 1,171,6 do we read that the C…

Thebe

(258 words)

Author(s): Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich) | Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster)
(Θήβη/ Thḗbē). [German version] [1] Daughter of Iason [2], 4th cent. BC Daughter of Iason [2] of Pherae; her name refers to Jason's former political soliciting of Boeotian support [1. 286] or her mother's origin in Thebes [2. 50]. In opposition to the tyrannical policies of her cousin and husband Alexander [15] of Pherae, in 364 BC T. encourages Pelopidas to intervene in Thessaly (Plut. Pelopidas 28 f.) and in 359 is supposed to have incited her brothers Tisiphonus and Lycophron [3] to assassinate Alexander…

Attaleia

(445 words)

Author(s): Martini, Wolfram (Gießen) | Kaletsch, Hans (Regensburg)
(Ἀττάλεια; Attáleia). [German version] [1] The modern Antalya This item can be found on the following maps: Christianity | Zenobia | Asia Minor | Limes | Lycii, Lycia | Pergamum | Pompeius The modern Antalya; harbour town, located on a rocky ridge on the coast of  Pamphylia, founded in around 150 BC by  Attalus [5] II (Str. 14,4,1), and visited by Pompey on his flight in 48 BC (Plut. Pompeius 76; cf. Ptol. 5,5,2; Acta Apostolorum 14,25). Remains of the Attalid town walls, Hadrian's gate, to mark the emperor's visit in AD 130, and a monumental mausoleum (circular building on a cubic base). Martini…

Traianopolis

(254 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen) | Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
(Τραιανόπολις; Traianópolis). [German version] [1] City in the Hebrus plain This item can be found on the following maps: Byzantium | Thraci, Thracia | Rome Founded by Traianus [1] at the beginning of the 2nd cent. AD on the northern coast of the Aegean (Aegean Sea) in the plain of the lower Hebrus on the site of Doriscus on the via Egnatia (Ptol. 3,11,13; It. Ant. 175,1-9), modern Loutrós. Minting of its own coins is documented. After Diocletianus' administrative reform, T. was one of the most important cities in the province of Rho…

Halisarna

(137 words)

Author(s): Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster) | Sonnabend, Holger (Stuttgart)
(Ἁλίσαρνα; Halísarna). [German version] [1] Small city in the border region of the regions Mysia and Troas Small city, dynastic seat in the border region of the regions of Mysia and the Troad. In Xenophon (Hell. 3,1,6; An. 7,8,17) H. is mentioned in connection with the Spartan-Persian war 400-396 BC. The dynast Procles named there is the descendant of the Spartan king Damaratus, who was exiled there at the beginning of the 5th cent. BC and received H. along with Pergamum and Teuthrania from Darius I as a gift (Paus. 3,7,8). The exact location and further history are unknown. Schwertheim, El…

Rhyndacus

(106 words)

Author(s): Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster)
[German version] (Ῥύνδακος/ Rhýndakos). River in the Troad, not regarded as a single body today (Koca Çay, Kocasu Çayı, Orhaneli Çayı). It rises in Mysia Abbaïtis and flows through Phrygia (Phryges). It formed the frontier between Mysia and Bithynia, forms lacus Apolloniatis (Uluabat Gölü), exiting the lake at the northwest and flowing into the Propontis south of the island of Besbikos (modern Imralı Adası). During the Roman Period, it formed the boundary between the provinces of Asia [2] and Bithynia. In 73 BC, Licinius [I 26] Lucullu…

Ceramon agora

(54 words)

Author(s): Drew-Bear, Thomas (Lyon)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Xenophon (Κεράμων ἀγορά; Kerámōn agorá). A ‘populated town’ between Peltae and  Caystrou pedion, ‘the last town (in Phrygia) in the direction of Mysia’, only mentioned in Xen. An. 1,2,11; localization impossible. Drew-Bear, Thomas (Lyon) Bibliography W. Ruge, s.v. K., RE 11, 254f.

Askania Limne

(62 words)

Author(s): Strobel, Karl (Klagenfurt)
[German version] (Ἀσκανία λίμνη; Askanía límnē). Ascanian Lake, also known as Lake  Nicaea in  Bithynia (modern İznik Gölü); the name was applied to the lake and the surrounding region, the western part of which was taken as belonging to Mysia, the eastern one to Phrygia (Str. 12,4,5; Plin. HN 5,40,8). Strobel, Karl (Klagenfurt) Bibliography W. Ruge, s.v. A., RE 2, 1610.

Mysius

(64 words)

Author(s): Käppel, Lutz (Kiel)
[German version] (Μύσιος/ Mýsios). Mythical Argive who received the goddess Demeter as a guest and was said to have erected a temple in her honour on the road from Argos to Mycene (Paus. 2,35,4). A festival held in Demeter's grove near Pellene, the Mysaeum, was also founded by him: the so-called Mysia (Paus. 7,27,9, cf. 2,18,3) [1]. Käppel, Lutz (Kiel) Bibliography 1 Nilsson, Feste, 327.

Abrettene

(79 words)

Author(s): Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster)
[German version] (Ἀβρεττηνή; Abrettēnḗ). Region in northern  Mysia, north of Abbaitis and south of Olympene (Plin. HN 5,123; Str. 12,8,9; 11). At the time of the 2nd Triumvirate (43-36/32 BC) Cleon, a leader of the many local bands of brigands, dominated the region. Confirmed in his leadership by the future  Augustus in about 30 BC, he was also a priest of  Zeus Abrettenus [1. 154]. Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster) Bibliography 1 E. Schwertheim, Die Inschr. von Hadrianoi und Hadrianeia (IK 33), 1987.

Aesepus

(98 words)

Author(s): Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster)
[German version] (Αἴσηπος; Aísēpos). River in  Mysia, modern Gönen Çay, rising at Mount Cotylus in the  Ida mountains (Str. 13,1,43). It is already mentioned by Homer (Il. 2,825; 4,91; 12; 21). In its course to the north-east, it takes in the Caresus. After 500 stades, it flows into the  Propontis near the island of Halone (modern Pasalimani) (Str. 13,1,11). Even in Homer's times, the valley of the A. defined the eastern border of the  Troas (Str. 13,1,9), and was densely populated in its middle reaches (Str. 13,1,45). Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster) Bibliography W. Leaf, Strabo on the T…

Teuthras

(129 words)

Author(s): Krebs, Christopher
[German version] (Τεύθρας; Teúthras). Possibly a son of Midius and Arge (IG XI 4,1207); he rules as eponymous king over Teuthrania (Apollod. 2,147) or Mysia (Plut. De fluviis 21,4). The figure of T. is most prominent in connexion with Auge [2] and Telephus [1] (Paus. 8,4,9 with a reference to Hecataeus). Ancient sources (additionally: Apollod. 3,103 f.; Diod.  Sic. 4,33) agree that T. marries Auge, who has been exposed, and raises her son (otherwise: Hyg. Fab. 100; Plut. ibid.  21,4). Plutarch tell…

Zeleia

(120 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Oracles (Ζέλεια; Zéleia). City in the valley of the Aesepus (Hom. Il. 2,824f.; 4,91; 4,103; 4,121; Str. 12,4,6; 12,8,11) in the territory of Cyzicus in Mysia, near modern Sarıköy. Homer (loc. cit.) describes Z. as the home city of Pandarus [1] and the latter as belonging to the Lycii; for this reason ancient commentators (cf. schol. Hom. Il. 2,826f.) assumed two regions with the name Lycia – one in the southwest of Asia Minor (Lycii, Lycia), the …

Argiope

(123 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
(Ἀργιόπη; Argiópē). [German version] [1] Nymph Nymph. Rejected by her lover Philammon, she journeys from Parnassus to the Odrysae in Thrace and there gives birth to the singer  Thamyris (Apollod. 1,16; Paus. 4,33,3) [1]. Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH) [German version] [2] Thracian wife of Orpheus Thracian wife of Orpheus, for whose sake he enters the Underworld (Hermesianax fr. 7,1-14 Powell). Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH) [German version] [3] Daughter of Teuthras Daughter of Teuthras, the king of Mysia, wife of  Telephus (Diod. Sic. 4,33). Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH) [German version] [4] D…

Cadi

(137 words)

Author(s): Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster)
[German version] (Κάδοι; Kádoi). A city first named by Pol. 33,12,2 near today's Gediz in the headwaters of the Hermus, where the Roman board of ten met with  Attalus [5] II in 155/4 BC. According to Ptol. 5,2,16, C. is located in the border region of Mysia, Phrygia and Lydia. The origin of the city is unknown, probably non-Greek. It is possible that C. was inhabited by Macedonian veterans since the time of Alexander the Great (Plin. HN 5,111). Since Str. 12,8,12 assigns C. to the Phrygía Epíktētos, it is likely that the region of C. came under the rule of Pergamum in 188 BC. C. s…

Macestus, Mecestus

(140 words)

Author(s): Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster)
[German version] (Μέγιστος; Mégistos). Aside from the Rhyndacus and the Tarsius, the largest river in northern Mysia (cf. Str. 12,8,11; Plin. HN 5,142; Pol. 5,77,8), modern Simav Çayı that like the Tarsius flows into the Rhyndacus north of Miletupolis. Attalus [4] I was encamped on the M., north of the Pelecas Mountains with the Galatian Aegosages on his campaign against Achaeus [5], when he experienced a lunar eclipse on 1 January 218 BC. A relief of Apollo Mekastenos is probably also reminiscent of this river [1]. Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster) Bibliography 1 F. W. Hasluck, Unpublished …

Aegosages

(167 words)

Author(s): Strobel, Karl (Klagenfurt)
[German version] (Αἰγοσάγες/ Aigoságes). Celtic tribe recruited by Attalus [4] I in 218 BC for the battle against Achaeus [5] in Thracia and taken to Asia Minor (Pol. 5,77 f.; 5,111,1-7; [1. 233, 243]). In Aeolia (Aeolians [2]) and Mysia, Attalus I operated successfully with the A. who, however, started a mutiny at the Macestus due to a lunar eclipse. Attalus kept his word to the A. and settled them at the Hellespontus where they proceeded to plunder the surrounding cities and finally occupied Iliu…

Teuthrania

(163 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Τευθρανία; Teuthranía). Region or its capital in the Mysian valley of the lower Caicus [1]. The name is derived from Teuthras, who reportedly took in Auge [2] and her son Telephus [1] as guests when they were washed ashore in Mysia. The region is generally located from the Aeolian coast between Atarneus and Cisthene (at modern Gömeç) inland about as far up as the upper Macestus. The site of the city (Str. 13,1,69; Plin. HN 5,126) has been located (though without certainty) near mo…

Telephus

(789 words)

Author(s): Käppel, Lutz (Kiel) | Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki) | Baumbach, Manuel (Zürich)
(Τήλεφος /Tḗlephos). [German version] [1] Son of Heracles and Auge Son of Heracles [1] and Auge [2] (Hes. fr. 165,8-10 M./W.). There are two legendary versions of his youth. According to one version (probably in essence epic, but also assumed by Euripides [1] in his T.), Auge of Tegea, a priestess of Athena, was made pregnant by Heracles [1], gave birth to T. and hid him in the sanctuary. When, as a consequence of this, the goddess imposed a famine and the child was discovered, Auge's father Aleus [1] had the child exposed (Exposure, myths…

Thersander

(193 words)

Author(s): Antoni, Silke (Kiel)
[German version] (Θέρσανδρος/ Thérsandros). Son of Polynices and Argea [2], brother of e.g. Alastor and Timeas, with Demonassa [1] father of Tisamenus [1] (Pind. O. 2,76-81 with schol.; Hdt. 4,147; 6,52). T. takes part in the Epigoni's successful campaign against Thebes [2] ( Epigoni [2]), after he - on the model of his father - has secured Alcmaeon [1]'s participation as the leader of the campaign by bribing Eriphyle with the péplos [1] of Harmonia (Diod. 4,66,1-3; Apollod. 3,80-82; 3,86; Paus. 2,20,5; 9,8,7). After the capture of Thebes he was given the city to r…
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